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MemberSteve Mentz

Steve Mentz is Professor of English at St. John’s University in New York City. His work explores Early Modern Literature, Ecocriticism, Shakespeare, and the Blue Humanities. Most recently he is the author of Break up the Anthropocene, (U Minn P, 2019), and  Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization 1550 – 1719 (U Minn P, 2015) and co-editor of The Sea and Nineteenth-Century Anglophone Literary Culture (Routledge, 2016). He is a Series Editor for Environmental Humanities in Premodern Culture (EHPC) for Amsterdam University Press.

MemberJohn Havard

I am an associate professor of English at Auburn University at Montgomery specializing in early American literature. My monograph, Hispanicism and Early U.S. Literature: Spain, Mexico, Cuba, and the Origins of U.S. National Identity, is forthcoming from the University of Alabama Press. My recent published essays include work on James Fenimore Cooper, Mary Peabody Mann, Martin Delany, and early African-American fiction. I am in the early stages of beginning a new book project on the influence of the rhetoric of religious liberty on early American literature.

MemberJames Daniel Elam

Rhetoric and Public Culture Program/Asian American Studies Program, Northwestern UniversityI write about Indian anticolonialism, print culture, modernism, and transnationalism between World War I and World War II. I currently teach South Asian/South Asian American literature and literatures of Afro-Asian Solidarity.I have written about Dhan Gopal Mukerji, W.E.B. DuBois, Bhagat Singh, Emma Goldman, and Lala Har Dayal.jdelam@u.northwestern.edu

MemberSean Chambers, MFA

Asst. Prof. of English (Rhetoric, Literature, Creative Writing). Adviser to The VFMC Mask & Spur Drama Careers Society (JD Salinger was a member). Vice President of the Community Breakfast Collaborative of the Main Line (PO Box 135, Villanova, PA 19085). Nonfiction Books Reviewer for Booklist Magazine (Booklistonline.com). Former archivist for editor and publisher Sol Stein. Proud Valiant & Hoo. Director of the Huntington HS Oral History & Documentary Project (2021) about a seminal educational institution for African Americans in Newport News, VA, the professor’s hometown near Christopher Newport U. and Hampton University.