Search

MemberDouglas Eyman

Douglas Eyman is Director of the PhD in Writing and Rhetoric, the MA concentration in Professional Writing and Rhetoric (PWR), and the undergraduate Professional Writing Minor at George Mason University.  He teaches courses in digital rhetoric, technical and scientific communication, editing, web authoring, advanced composition, and professional writing. His current research interests include investigations of digital literacy acquisition and development, new media scholarship, electronic publication, information design/information architecture, teaching in digital environments, and video games as sites of composition. Eyman is the senior editor and publisher of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy, an online journal that has been publishing peer-reviewed scholarship on computers and writing since 1996. His most recent publications include Digital Rhetoric: Theory, Method, Practice (University of Michigan Press, 2015) and Play/Write: Games, Writing, Digital Rhetoric (co-edited with Andrea Davis, Parlor Press, 2016). His scholarly work has appeared in Pedagogy, Computers and Composition, Technical Communication, Cultural Practices of Literacy (Erlbaum, 2007), Digital Writing Research(Hampton Press, 2007), Rhetorically Rethinking Usability (Hampton Press, 2008), Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities (Chicago, 2015), and Microhistories of Composition (Utah State, 2015).  

MemberBrianna Grantham, PhD

After living on St. Thomas, in the U.S. Virgin Islands for five years, Brianna relocated to the Pacific Northwest in February 2015. In the spirit of civilization and maturity, Brianna then rejoined the corporate world as a proposal and marketing writer for a technology solutions company until late 2015. She left the corporate world after realizing it’s not all it’s cracked up to be, focusing her time and energy on completing her doctoral work and relaunching her business. Brianna graduated with her PhD in Creative Writing in July 2017. She currently offers writing, editing, and marketing services through her marketing and communications consulting company, BJG Consulting, LLC full-time. Brianna also reads and reviews books for new and established authors. She typically specializes in Young Adult (YA) fiction, science fiction, fantasy, female-centric and feminist literature, family themes, and academic pieces, but is open to all queries. Brianna’s research interests include feminist theory in literature, teaching Standard English composition to English-dialect speakers, bridging culture gaps between texts and students, bridging the communication divide between professors and students, teaching composition using novels, and effective pedagogy for teaching English composition.

MemberAlyssa Arbuckle

I live and work in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Presently, I am the Associate Director of the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) at the University of Victoria. I focus on research facilitation — connecting researchers and partners, organizing academic conferences and events, writing reports and articles, etc. In this role with the ETCL I have the pleasure of working with the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) group and helping out with the coordination of the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). I am also an interdisciplinary PhD student at the University of Victoria, studying open social scholarship and its implementation (planned completion 2019). My studies have centred around digital humanities, new media, and contemporary American literature. I am especially interested in open access, digital publishing, and how text lives online. To this end, my work has appeared in Digital Studies, Digital Humanities Quarterly, and Scholarly and Research Communication, among other venues. I’ve given presentations, ran workshops, or coordinated events in Vancouver, Victoria, Whistler, Toronto, Ottawa, Austin, New York, Paris, and Sydney. Otherwise, I spend my time devoted to books, bicycling, yoga, friends, and exploring the Pacific Northwest.

MemberHania A.M. Nashef

Hania A. M. Nashef is an associate professor in the Department of Mass Communication at the American University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. Her publications include Palestinian Culture and the Nakba: Bearing Witness, The Politics of Humiliation in the Novels of J. M. Coetzee and other articles on J.M. Coetzee and José Saramago, including “Becomings in J.M. Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians and José Saramago’s Blindness,” and in Comparative Literature Studies, and recently “Specters of Doom: Saramago’s Dystopias in Blindness and The Cave.” She has also published on Palestinian literature, film and Arab media representations, including  “Disconcerting images: Arab female portrayals on Arab television,” in Interventions, “Barbaric space: Portrayal of Arab lands in Hollywood films,” in Popular Culture in the Middle East and North Africa, “Demythologizing the Palestinian in Hany Abu-Assad’s Omar and Paradise Now” in Transnational Cinemas, “Virtuality and différance in the age of the hyperreal,” in Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication and more recently “Challenging the myth of “a land without a people’: Mahmoud Darwish’s Journal of an Ordinary Grief and In the Presence of Absence in The Journal of Commonwealth Literature and “Two memories: Darwish and Shehadeh recount their days under siege,” in Prose Studies: History, Theory, Criticism and others.  

MemberEugenia Zuroski

Eugenia Zuroski has been a member of the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University since 2009. Gena is author of the book A Taste for China: English Subjectivity and the Prehistory of Orientalism (Oxford University Press, 2013), which argues that chinoiserie played an integral role in the formation of modern English subjectivity. Tracing a shift in the relationship between English selves and “things Chinese” from the Restoration through the early nineteenth century, this study shows how both orientalism and privatized subjectivity take shape through cultural processes of disavowing earlier ideals, including cosmopolitanism and aristocratic power. Gena has published articles in Novel: A Forum on Fiction, Eighteenth-Century Studies, and Journal18. In addition to teaching courses in literatures and cultures of the long eighteenth century, she teaches introductory level undergraduate courses in short fiction and poetry and one of the core courses in the graduate Cultural Studies and Critical Theory (CSCT) program, “Foundations in CSCT.” In addition to her teaching and research, Gena serves as editor of Eighteenth-Century Fiction, winner of the 2017 CELJ Voyager Award. She has edited special issues of ECF on “Exoticism & Cosmopolitanism” (Fall 2012) and “The Senses of Humour” (Summer 2014, co-edited with Patrick Coleman [Dept. of French & Francophone Studies, UCLA]). Most recently, she co-edited a 2-part special issue of ECF on “Material Fictions” with Michael Yonan (Dept. of Art History and Archaeology, U of Missouri), published in late 2018 and early 2019. The recipient of a SSHRC Insight Grant, Gena is currently completing the book A Funny Thing: The Exotic Detail in Eighteenth-Century Britain, which argues for the emergence of politically relevant forms of exotified “funniness” in eighteenth-century literature, aesthetics, and subjectivity.  She has been invited to present portions of this project at the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities 18th/19th-Century Colloquium at Vanderbilt University; the Columbia University Seminar in Eighteenth-Century European Culture; the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies Research Seminar at the University of York, UK; and the University of East Anglia Research Seminar. Gena serves on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Society of Learned Journals, the Executive Board of the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Editorial Board of Scholarly and Research Communication, and the Advisory Board of the Hamilton Review of Books. She is currently the faculty co-chair of McMaster’s President’s Advisory Committee on Building an Inclusive Community (PACBIC), and an organizing member of the #BIPOC18 and #Bigger6 collectives. Her first chapbook of poetry, Hovering, Seen, was published by Anstruther Press in 2019.

MemberPayton Phillips-García Quintanilla

Research Interests —Early modern literature and visual/material culture, with a focus on the transatlantic Iberian world —Mestizaje (various forms, functions, products, and practices of sociocultural mixing) —Rebellion and resistance in Andalucía and the Andes, particularly among minoritized indigenous communities —The figure of the Virgin Mary in conquest, conversion, and colonization —Hispanic classical theater (comedia), including its translation and performance —Diasporas and diasporic cultures of Sephardic and Morisco communities, in the Mediterranean and beyond —Romance-language texts written in Arabic and Hebrew scripts (aljamía), and their contexts and transmission   Current Employment Lecturer | UCLA Department of Spanish and Portuguese —Teach all levels of Spanish language, including conversation and composition, while appropriately incorporating Peninsular and Latin American literatures, histories, arts, and cultures into our communicative, hybrid curriculum Research Assistant | Getty Research Institute  —Support visiting scholars in the development of their projects by conducting research in Special Collections, compiling bibliographies and literature reviews, assisting with editing and translation, and/or other tasks as needed Research Associate | Dr. Roger L. Martínez-Dávila —Conduct research and co-author reports with Dr. Martínez-Dávila (Associate Professor of History, University of Colorado-Colorado Springs) on Sephardic family lineages for clients of Carbray International Law Firm (Spain)