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MemberMaria Seger

I’m an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. My research and teaching interests include early and nineteenth-century American literature, African American literature, US ethnic literatures, and critical race and ethnic studies. As a literary and cultural studies scholar, I am broadly interested in the violence of racial capitalism in US literature and culture. My work primarily deals with how violence arises out of and impacts capitalist social relations and ideological production, especially as it relates to notions of selfhood, ownership, and state power across the long nineteenth century. Right now, I’m at work on my book project, At All Costs: Extralegal Violence and Liberal Democracy in American Culture, which examines extralegal violence not as a lawless force that threatened American liberal-democratic governance but instead as emerging from and further entrenching the conditions that governance set.

MemberJeanne L. Gillespie

Dr. Jeanne Gillespie holds a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish from Purdue, a Master of Arts in Latin American Studies with concentrations in Anthropology and Art History from the University of Texas at Austin and a doctorate in Spanish with a concentration in Colonial Latin American Literature from the Arizona State University.Gillespie has published in peer-reviewed venues on Spanish colonial literary and cultural studies as well as in several areas related to innovative pedagogies and interdisciplinary inquiry. Her current research passion is the documentation of plant materials and healing practices in indigenous Mexican documents, especially poetic and dramatic texts that were collected during the Spanish colonial administration. In conjunction with that research avenue, she is preparing an article on women’s voices in the Iberian colonial record that examines Native American women whose words and accounts have been recorded in Spanish documents.Gillespie is also working on an article examining the letters to and from the Duchess of Aveiro, Maria Guadalupe de Lencastre, a driving force in the Jesuit missionary endeavors in Latin America and Asia. She is preparing a book manuscript Performing Spanish Louisiana: Isleño Décimas and the Narratives of St. Bernard Parish, an analysis of Isleño texts, images, and folklore from this Spanish-speaking community in south Louisiana. Gillespie exhibits a passion for finding fascinating stories and rendering them into accessible narratives for reflection and further investigation. She also actively participates in the dissemination of innovations in teaching and learning, including collaborative and integrative learning, online learning, digital initiatives, study abroad and other experiential learning pedagogies. She has taught courses at all levels of Spanish language and cultures. In addition, she teaches in the Women’s and Gender Studies program and in Interdisciplinary Studies. Gillespie is married to musician, John Palensky and is the mother of three vivacious children. Her home is filled with good food, great music and much love.

MemberKatie Daily-Bruckner

Presently a Visiting Assistant Professor at the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York, I previously taught at Boston College after earning my Ph.D. in May 2015. My research focuses on twenty-first century American immigration narratives and I read literature and nonfiction alongside domestic policy relating to 9/11. My current book project, “Who Am I With? Disaffiliation in Contemporary Immigration Narratives,” recently won the 2017 NeMLA Book Prize for outstanding unpublished manuscript.

MemberMin Hyoung Song

Born in Seoul, Min grew up in Detroit and its suburbs, and has spent most of his adult life in the greater Boston area. His first full-time job out of graduate school is the same job he still has, which is teaching Asian American literature, American studies, and contemporary literature at Boston College. He went to a Catholic high school, so he finds it weirdly comforting to be working at a Jesuit university. Plus ça change. In recent years, he’s grown very concerned about the weather.

MemberLaurence E. Hooper

My research focuses on literary authorship in Italian culture of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. I study how writers in the vernacular drew on learnèd disciplines like theology and law to establish their authority.I usually write on major figures such as Dante and Petrarch, although I am also interested in their less well-known contemporaries such as Guido Guinizzelli, Brunetto Latini, or Cino da Pistoia. I have published several articles on the connection between medieval authorship and the experience of exile and am preparing a book manuscript on this topic. Forthcoming work will examine the theory of characterization in Dante and in Petrarch.I have also published on twentieth-century Italian culture, including articles on Pier Paolo Pasolini’s theater and his narrative realism, and an article and a book chapter on the translation of dialect poetry.

MemberDrew Daniel

My teaching centers upon English literature of the 16th and 17th century, especially the drama of Shakespeare, Marlowe and Jonson and the poetry of Spenser and Milton, but I also frequently teach the intersection of that literary archive with political philosophy, metaphysics, medical writing, affect theory, eco-materialism, queer theory and psychoanalysis. In a separate stream of writing and thinking, I work on musical subculture and performance. When I’m not doing those things, I also make electronic music with my partner in a group called Matmos and by myself as The Soft Pink Truth.

MemberLeonora Souza Paula

Leonora is an Assistant Professor in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities at Michigan State University. She specializes in twentieth and twenty first century Brazilian Literature and Culture. Her research and teaching interests include Latin American Literature and Culture, Afro-Brazilian Culture, Critical Geographies, Crime Fiction, Urban Art, Social Movements and Graphic Novels. Her current research focuses on the role of under-represented knowledge production in changing the exclusionary terrain of contemporary Brazilian culture. Her work has been published in Brazil and the United States.

MemberAndrew N. Rubin

Andrew N. Rubin is a Scholar in Residence in English and Comparative Literature and Critical and Postcolonial Theory at Georgetown University. His most recent book, Archives of Authority: Empire, Culture, and the Cold War, was published by Princeton University Press in 2012 in its TransNation/Translation series. He is also the co-editor of Adorno: A Critical Reader and the co-editor of The Edward Said Reader, as well as a forthcoming edition of Said’s collected works. He has written extensively on Edward W. Said, Theodor Adorno, George Orwell, and Joseph Conrad, and more widely on subjects such as the category of world literature and transnational modernisms for journals including Alif: Journal of Comparative Poetics, The South Atlantic Quarterly, The Journal of Palestine Studies, Arab Studies Quarterly, The Nation, The New Statesman, and al-ahram. In 2006, he was nominated by the B(R)ussel’s Tribunal Human Rights award for his essay in The New Statesman on the assassination of Iraqi academics and intellectuals. In 2007, he was the recipient of a Lannan Residency. He is currently working on a manuscript entitled Imperial Traces: Late Imperialism and the Terrain of World Literature, and has recently completed a monograph entitled Exiled in America: José Marti, Hannah Arendt, C. L. R. James, and Edward Said. More information can be found on http://andrewrubin.me.He has taught, researched, and written in the fields of Transnational Modernism, Twentieth Century Anglophone Literature and Culture, World Literature, Critical and Postcolonial Theory, and Comparative Literature.