Search

DepositDisrupting Labor in the Digital Humanities; or, The Classroom Is Not Your Crowd

Digital humanists have a labor problem, but it’s not what you might think. In this chapter, I describe the problem of student labor in digital humanities as I see it, and examine some of the structural issues that drive the use of student labor. I place the labor economy of digital humanities projects within the broader context of the innovation economy writ large to demonstrate how labor within the academy cannot operate under the same system of consensual participation which informs movements like crowdsourcing and crowdfunding. And in conclusion, I offer suggestions for how ethically managed student labor in the classroom can empower students to demonstrate both CV-ready skills and humanistic knowledge in durable products for which they receive full credit.

DepositTowards Interoperable Network Ontologies for the Digital Humanities

Scholars have long been interested in networks. Networks of scholarly exchange, trade, kinship, and patronage are some of the many such longstanding subjects of study. Recent and ongoing digital humanities projects are now considering networks with fresh approaches and increasingly complex datasets. At the heart of these digital projects are ‘network ontologies’ — functional data models for distilling the complicated, messy connections between historical people, objects, and places. Although scholars creating network ontologies necessarily focus on different types of content, if these networks are to form a coherent body of scholarship in the future, we must work towards the creation of interoperable ontological structures, rather than yet another set of competing standards. Here we examine the methodological considerations behind designing such interoperable ontologies, focusing primarily on the example of Early Modern historical networks. We argue that it would be infeasible to adopt a single ontological standard for all possible digital humanities projects; flexibility is essential to accommodate all subjects and objects of humanistic enquiry, from the micro-level to the longue-durée. However, we believe it possible to establish shared practices to structure these network ontologies on an ongoing basis in order to ensure their long-term interoperability.

DepositIntroduction to Digital Humanities, Fall 2017 syllabus

This syllabus was my fourth version of a course aimed at introducing the digital humanities at an undergraduate level. The course was organized around four projects, each of which was oriented by a theoretical reading: mapping a novel; text analysis with archival sources; creating composite images from digital films; and text digitization, extraction, and analysis from a large, in-copyright corpus.

TopicDigital Humanities Approaches to Japanese-Language Texts

<p class=”p1″>CFP NY 2018: Digital Humanities Approaches to Japanese-Language Texts</p> <p class=”p1″><span class=”s1″>Papers on the application of DH techniques to pre-modern and modern Japanese literature. Challenges, possibilities, needs, and ideas. 250-word abstract and CV by 15 March 2017; Michael Emmerich (<span class=”s2″>emmerich@humnet.ucla.edu</span>).</span></p>

TopicCFP Digital Humanities Approaches to Japanese-Language Texts

<p class=”p1″>CFP Digital Humanities Approaches to Japanese-Language Texts (NY 2018)</p> <p class=”p1″><span class=”s1″>Papers on the application of DH techniques to pre-modern and modern Japanese literature. Challenges, possibilities, needs, and ideas. 250-word abstract and CV by 15 March 2017; Michael Emmerich (<span class=”s2″>emmerich@humnet.ucla.edu</span>).</span></p>