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MemberVivian Nun Halloran

My research and teaching interests are profoundly interdisciplinary. In the courses I teach as well as in my writing, I investigate how literary genres such as autobiography, short fiction, and the novel intersect with, and mutually inform, scientific discourse, nutritionism, popular culture, or museums as sites of cultural performance. I am a Caribbeanist by training, and a literary food studies scholar by vocation. My first book, Exhibiting Slavery, considers how postmodern Caribbean historical novels about slavery function as museums by curating artwork and other objects within their pages. I contend that the novels thematize the second-hand way through which we come to learn about history as a textual encounter with the past. I also argue that postmodernism’s penchant for excess becomes the means through which we acknowledge our own inability to imagine the commonplace physical and ideological violence of treating people like chattel. My second book, The Immigrant Kitchen, analyzes the life writing subgenre of the food memoir with recipes, to think through how the trauma of immigration is inherited down the generations. My overall contention is that the interactive relationship facilitated by the recipes is a manifestation of virtual hospitality, wherein the reader accepts the writer’s welcome to his/her domestic space by preparing the food s/he reads about in the memoir.

MemberLevi Thompson

Levi Thompson holds a BA in History and Government from the College of William and Mary in Virginia, where he grew up in the Appalachian Mountains. He has an MA in Arabic and Islamic Studies from the University of Pennsylvania and a PhD in Arabic Literature from the University of California, Los Angeles. His dissertation, Speaking Laterally: Transnational Poetics and the Rise of Modern Arabic and Persian Poetry in Iraq and Iran (https://escholarship.org/uc/item/3bq9v3sc), brings together the theoretical richness of Comparative Literature and the philological rigor of Area Studies to critically investigate the development of literary modernism in the Middle East. After completing his PhD in 2017, Levi was the Artemis A.W. and Martha Joukowsky Postdoctoral Fellow in Gender Studies at the Pembroke Center at Brown University, where he was a member of the Pembroke Seminar organized on the topic “The Cultures of Pacifism.” While at Brown, he transformed a dissertation chapter into the forthcoming article “An Iraqi Poet and the Peace Partisans: Transnational Pacifism and the Poetry of Badr Shākir al-Sayyāb,” to appear in College Literature. He is currently working on several projects, including a book manuscript tentatively titled Re-Orienting Modernism: East-East Poetic Exchange in Arabic and Persian, a book chapter about the Iranian leftist poet Aḥmad Shāmlū for a collection on Persian literature as world literature, and translations of poetry and prose by the Syro-Palestinian poet Ramy al-Asheq, among others. Levi teaches courses covering modern Middle Eastern literature, cinema, and culture more broadly, with a focus on the Arabic- and Persian-speaking worlds during the twentieth century. While studying Arabic in Cairo during the 2011 uprising, Levi co-founded Tahrir Documents, a digital archive of paper ephemera distributed by protestors in Tahrir Square which a group of volunteers collected, translated into English, and made available online.

MemberMartin Paul Eve

Martin Paul Eve is Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London. Previously he was a Lecturer in English at the University of Lincoln, UK and an Associate Tutor/Lecturer at the University of Sussex, where he completed his Ph.D. Martin specialises in contemporary American fiction (primarily the works of Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo and David Foster Wallace), histories and philosophies of technology, and technological mutations in scholarly publishing. He is the author of four books, Pynchon and Philosophy: Wittgenstein, Foucault and Adorno (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014: 9781137405494), Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future (Cambridge University Press, 2014: 9781107484016), Password (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016: 9781501314872), and Literature Against Criticism: University English & Contemporary Fiction in Conflict (Open Book Publishers, 2016: 9781783742738). From 2015-2020, Martin is a member of the UK English Association’s Higher Education committee. In addition, Martin is well-known for his work on open access and HE policy, appearing before the UK House of Commons Select Committee BIS Inquiry into Open Access, writing for the British Academy Policy Series on the topic, being a steering-group member of the OAPEN-UK project, the Jisc National Monograph Strategy Group, the SCONUL Strategy Group on Academic Content and Communications, the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Open Access Steering Group, the Jisc Scholarly Communications Advisory Group, the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation advisory board, the California Digital Library/University of California Press’s Humanities Book Infrastructure advisory board, and the HEFCE Open Access Monographs Expert Reference Panel (2014) and founding the Open Library of Humanities.

MemberKirsten Kasai

Kirsten Imani Kasai writes fiction, nonfiction and poetry while teaching creative writing and English composition to adults. Her fourth novel The House of Erzulie will be published in February 2018 by Shade Mountain Press. Her extensive experience in print and digital publication management inspired her to launch The Magic Word Editing Co., which offers a full range of editorial and e-book design services to emerging and published writers, independent publishers, academics, scientists and small businesses. She’s also the editor and publisher of Body Parts Magazine, an online literary journal.      Her areas of expertise and interest include: women’s and feminist literature, utopias & dystopias in pop culture and literature, the Hero’s Journey, genre fiction (historical, dark fantasy & sci-fi, speculative fiction, horror and Gothic), literary and commercial fiction, fairy tales, mythology, folklore, and hybrid, experimental and multi-genre prose. She has been a discussion panelist and moderator, guest speaker and workshop leader for writing/publishing and pop culture/genre conventions and conferences (Southern California Writer’s Conference, Comic Con, LosCon, BayCon, ConDor). She is available to book as a speaker or writing workshop leader.      Kirsten holds an M.F.A. in Creative Writing and Certification in the Teaching of Creative Writing from Antioch University Los Angeles. Visit her online at KirstenImaniKasai.com. A full list of publications and appearances is available here.

MemberPayton Phillips-García Quintanilla

Research Interests —Early modern literature and visual/material culture, with a focus on the transatlantic Iberian world —Mestizaje (various forms, functions, products, and practices of sociocultural mixing) —Rebellion and resistance in Andalucía and the Andes, particularly among minoritized indigenous communities —The figure of the Virgin Mary in conquest, conversion, and colonization —Hispanic classical theater (comedia), including its translation and performance —Diasporas and diasporic cultures of Sephardic and Morisco communities, in the Mediterranean and beyond —Romance-language texts written in Arabic and Hebrew scripts (aljamía), and their contexts and transmission   Current Employment Lecturer | UCLA Department of Spanish and Portuguese —Teach all levels of Spanish language, including conversation and composition, while appropriately incorporating Peninsular and Latin American literatures, histories, arts, and cultures into our communicative, hybrid curriculum Research Assistant | Getty Research Institute  —Support visiting scholars in the development of their projects by conducting research in Special Collections, compiling bibliographies and literature reviews, assisting with editing and translation, and/or other tasks as needed Research Associate | Dr. Roger L. Martínez-Dávila —Conduct research and co-author reports with Dr. Martínez-Dávila (Associate Professor of History, University of Colorado-Colorado Springs) on Sephardic family lineages for clients of Carbray International Law Firm (Spain)

MemberAnthony Adler

Anthony Curtis Adler is professor of Comparative Literature at Yonsei’s Underwood International College in South Korea, where he has taught since 2006. He is the author of Celebricities: Media Culture and the Phenomenology of Gadget Commodity Life (Fordham: 2016), a critical edition of Fichte’s The Closed Commercial State, and a short book titled The Afterlife of Genre: Remnants of the Trauerspiel in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. He has also published numerous articles, in such journals as Continental Philosophy ReviewAngelakiCultural CritiqueDiacritics, and Seminar. He is currently working on a book on Friedrich Hoelderlin’s Hyperion.

MemberRamzi Salti

Ramzi Salti, Ph.D. Lecturer of Arabic, Author & Radio Host Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-2006 ___ My Stanford Faculty Page: https://profiles.stanford.edu/ramzi-salti My Arabology Blog: http://www.arabology.org Arabology on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arabology My Arabology Podcasts: https://soundcloud.com/arabology Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/author/ramzisalti LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/ramzisalti Stanford DLCL Page: https://dlcl.stanford.edu/people/ramzi-salti