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MemberPaige Morgan

…Ph.D., English & Textual Studies, University of Washington (2014)

M.A., English, University of Washington (2006)

 …

Paige Morgan is the Digital Humanities Librarian at the University of Miami. Before joining the University of Miami she held a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship at McMaster University in Ontario. She completed her PhD in English and Textual Studies at the University of Washington, where she developed the Demystifying Digital Humanities curriculum with Sarah Kremen-Hicks and Brian Gutierrez through a grant from the Simpson Center for the Humanities. Paige’s research interests include data modeling for humanities subjects, linked open data, social infrastructure for digital scholarship, emotional labor in tech contexts. She has served as a consultant and data wrangler on a variety of projects, including the CLIR microgrant project Identifying Early Modern Books (IdEMB). She teaches workshops and short courses on DH at training events such as DHSI and DH@Guelph. You can find her writing on topics related to digital humanities and libraries, as well as 18th and 19th century English poetry in journals such as Romanticism, Romantic Circles, and DH+Lib.

MemberRebecca Colesworthy

Rebecca Colesworthy is the acquisitions editor in gender and queer studies, Latin American studies, education, and c20/21 studies at SUNY Press. Her own scholarly specialization is modernism, from interdisciplinary and transnational perspectives; other areas of interest include feminist theory, psychoanalysis, and notions of the gift from pretty much any and every field. Her monograph, Returning the Gift: Modernism and the Thought of Exchange, was published by Oxford UP at the end of 2018, and she is the editor, with Peter Nicholls (NYU) of How Abstract Is It? Thinking Capital Now (Routledge, 2016), initially published as a special issue of Textual Practice).

MemberLaura A. Shackelford

My research examines and exploits the comparative perspective post-World War II literary texts, in print or digital media, provide on digital cultures. I study literary encounters with digital cultures in a variety of media – print fiction, electronic literatures, digital games, graphic novels, and film. I’m particularly interested in how such experimental, cross-media literary and artistic practices, in experimenting with narrative and digital textualities and poetics, register and creatively and critically reflect on contemporary digital cultures, information and systems sciences, and computation-based technologies in the U.S. My research draws on feminist science studies and systems’ theoretical methods.

MemberAlyssa Arbuckle

I live and work in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Presently, I am the Associate Director of the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) at the University of Victoria. I focus on research facilitation — connecting researchers and partners, organizing academic conferences and events, writing reports and articles, etc. In this role with the ETCL I have the pleasure of working with the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) group and helping out with the coordination of the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). I am also an interdisciplinary PhD student at the University of Victoria, studying open social scholarship and its implementation (planned completion 2019). My studies have centred around digital humanities, new media, and contemporary American literature. I am especially interested in open access, digital publishing, and how text lives online. To this end, my work has appeared in Digital Studies, Digital Humanities Quarterly, and Scholarly and Research Communication, among other venues. I’ve given presentations, ran workshops, or coordinated events in Vancouver, Victoria, Whistler, Toronto, Ottawa, Austin, New York, Paris, and Sydney. Otherwise, I spend my time devoted to books, bicycling, yoga, friends, and exploring the Pacific Northwest.

MemberTeresa Marie Hooper

I teach and study the entire Medieval and Early Renaissance periods, but I specialize in Early Medieval Literature with a focus in Anglo-Saxon England, medieval manuscripts, and just a little Late Antiquity for good measure. My areas of interest for teaching and research purposes include (but often wander outside of: Anglo-Saxon codicology; Anglo-Saxon language and literature; memory studies; LA/medieval cultural geography, cosmography, and travel narratives; LA, medieval, and Early Modern ethnography and exploration; early Latin saint’s lives; Latin texts in English translation; monsters and teratology; Chaucerian dream poems; Renaissance poetry; and Ancient to modern drama. My current research interests include the textual and codicological history of the Beowulf-Manuscript (London, BL Cotton Vitellius A.xv, part 2), the earliest Latin St. Christopher legend, and the OE and Latin versions of Orosius’ History against the Pagans.