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MemberAdrienne Williams Boyarin

Adrienne Williams Boyarin (PhD UC Berkeley, 2006) is Associate Professor of English and English Graduate Program Advisor at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. She is author of Miracles of the Virgin in Medieval England: Law and Jewishness in Marian Legends (D.S. Brewer 2010), praised as “elegantly written, scrupulously researched,” and a model of “codicological expertise” (Speculum 88.1, 2013). She is editor and translator of the alliterative Siege of Jerusalem (Broadview 2013, rev. in TLS) and Miracles of the Virgin in Middle English (Broadview 2015, rev. in TMR), and the founding Executive Editor of the journal Early Middle English (Arc Humanities/Amsterdam UP). Her research interests include Jewish-Christian polemics, medieval Anglo-Jewish history, Early Middle English (and the multilingual Early Middle English period broadly), manuscript studies, Marian texts, and gender studies. She is a former member of the MLA Executive Committee for TC Religion and Literature (2014-2019) and the MLA Delegate Assembly (2017-2019).  

MemberTeresa Marie Hooper

I teach and study the entire Medieval and Early Renaissance periods, but I specialize in Early Medieval Literature with a focus in Anglo-Saxon England, medieval manuscripts, and just a little Late Antiquity for good measure. My areas of interest for teaching and research purposes include (but often wander outside of: Anglo-Saxon codicology; Anglo-Saxon language and literature; memory studies; LA/medieval cultural geography, cosmography, and travel narratives; LA, medieval, and Early Modern ethnography and exploration; early Latin saint’s lives; Latin texts in English translation; monsters and teratology; Chaucerian dream poems; Renaissance poetry; and Ancient to modern drama. My current research interests include the textual and codicological history of the Beowulf-Manuscript (London, BL Cotton Vitellius A.xv, part 2), the earliest Latin St. Christopher legend, and the OE and Latin versions of Orosius’ History against the Pagans. 

MemberKym Weed

My research and teaching coalesce around the literary and cultural study of science and medicine, exploring the narratives that shape understandings of illness, health, disability, and embodiment. My book manuscript, “Our Microbes: Imagining Human Interdependence with Bacteria in American Literature, Science, and Culture, 1880-1930,” merges my background in microbiology and literary studies to examine the diverse representations of microorganisms in the years between the popularization of germ theory and the widespread use of antibiotics.

MemberJoanne Leow

Joanne Leow is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research and teaching interests are in the fields of decolonizing literatures, postcolonial studies, urbanism, ecocriticism, and Asian/Asian North American literatures. She has published on Southeast Asian literature and film, and diasporic North American literature in the Journal of Commonwealth Literature, Canadian Literature, Studies in Canadian Literature, Journal of Postcolonial Writing and Journal of Asian American Studies. She is currently at work on two major research projects. The first is a book manuscript entitled Unmapping Authoritarianism: Urban Space and Cultural Production in Contemporary Singapore. She is also embarking on a multi-site study of futuristic waterfront developments and speculative cultural texts from Singapore, Hong Kong, Vancouver, and Dubai. This second project, which she began during her SSHRC postdoctoral fellowship at McMaster University, is entitled “Water, Sand, Steel, and Glass: Urban Ecologies and Literary Speculations.”

MemberMichael Saman

My research focuses on German literary and intellectual history of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and on intersections of German and Africana intellectual culture.
My current work in progress includes a book manuscript on classical German thought in W.E.B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk; studies of the reception of Kant in Goethe’s late literary and scientific work; a study of intertextuality and systemic closure in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit; a comparative methodological study of the thought of Goethe and of Lévi-Strauss; and a contextualization of the work of Kraftwerk within postwar German politics and aesthetics.
I have been a fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Fulbright Foundation, and have taught at Princeton University, UCLA, Brown University, the College of William & Mary, and the College of the Holy Cross.

MemberEliseo Jacob

Eliseo Jacob is a lecturer in the Department of World Languages and Cultures at Howard University.  He as a Ph.D. from the Department of Spanish & Portuguese at The University of Texas at Austin.  His research and teaching interests include Latin American urban literature and culture, Latin American cultural studies, contemporary Brazilian literature and culture, with a concentration on Afro-Brazilian literary and cultural productions.  His research project focuses on the literary and cultural productions from the urban periphery of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro.  Using the theories of the public sphere, race and urban space, he examines how these writers create counterpublics within the immaterial space of the literary text and in the physical space of the city through the circulation of their literary works at cultural events known as saraus.      

MemberJared Richman

Jared S. Richman is Associate Professor of English at Colorado College where his teaching centers on literatures of Britain’s long eighteenth century, radical culture, satire, critical disability studies, and comics and graphic narrative. He is currently finishing a manuscript entitled“Transatlantic Realms”: British Romanticism and the Idea of America, 1780-1832. He has published essays on various authors including William Blake, Charlotte Smith, Anna Seward, John Thelwall, and Mary Shelley. His most recent project traces the relationship between nascent elocutionary theories of the Enlightenment and disability in Anglo-American culture.

MemberSarah Arens

I’m currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. My research focuses broadly on themes of memory, (labour) migration, and exile in Francophone literature from North and Sub-Saharan Africa, especially from Morocco and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. I also have a strong secondary research interest that focuses on the intersections of Postcolonial Theory and Jewish Studies across different languages and “unlikely” geographical contexts. I’m currently working on a book manuscript on representations of the city of Brussels in contemporary postcolonial writing in French. My new project focuses on the Belgian colonial health system via literary, scientific, and religious archives. I am also the Editor of the Bulletin for Francophone Postcolonial Studies (the journal of the Society for Postcolonial Studies) and a Volunteer Translator at the Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide in London (since 2015).

MemberStacey Balkan

Stacey Balkan is assistant professor of Environmental Literature and Humanities at Florida Atlantic University.  Her research focuses on postcolonial ecologies and the politics of representation in the Global South; landscape aesthetics and counter-pastoralism; Anthropocene studies; radical materialism; and environmental justice.  Stacey’s recent articles for The Global South and ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment examine the legacy of uneven and combined development in Nigeria and India; and she is now at work on two book-length manuscripts–Rogues in the Postcolony: Developing Itinerancy in India and Oil Fictions: World Literature and our Contemporary Petrosphere. Critiquing development policies in colonial and postcolonial India, Rogues in the Postcolony  foregrounds the intersection(s) between landscape ideology, agricultural improvement, and historical trauma as each obtains in British-occupied Bengal, post- independence Mumbai and New Delhi, and late-capitalist Bhopal. From the transformation of commonly held land for agriculture, whether in the form of plantation regimes or contemporary agribusiness, to the emergent slum ecologies of India’s premier urban enclaves, modern improvement schemes have hinged on the removal of figures who have lately found expression in novels that replace the neoliberal fictions of the “new India” with the itinerant narratives of the postcolonial pícaro. These stories constitute what Balkan calls an “aesthetics of indigence,” which brings into sharp focus what picaresque enthusiasts have long characterized as la vida buscóna–translated loosely as the “low life” of the working-class protagonist. Stacey is also co-editing a forthcoming collection entitled Oil Fictions: World literature and our Contemporary Petrosphere–an anthology situated within the emergent field of Petrocultures. Oil Fictions presents an attempt to grapple with the pervasiveness of this often-invisible biocultural agent through the cultivation of a robust petro-aesthetic practice. Her recent work also includes essays on the Anthropocene and its relationship to Empire for Global South Studies and Public Books; and her earlier research, born of several years teaching Contemporary Latin American Literature and Anglophone World Literature at Bergen Community College in New Jersey, has been published in The Cambridge Companion to Comparative Literature, World Literature and Comparative Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature and Culture.  At BCC, she also served as the co-director of the college’s Literary Arts Series and as a fellow for the Center for Peace, Justice, and Reconciliation.