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MemberBrea Henson

Brea (Breanne) Henson is the Administrative Specialist for the Public services Division of University of North Texas Libraries. Ms. Henson assists librarians by assessment, event, instruction, and research support. Current projects that she is assisting with include an annotated bibliography on Liaison Pedagogy with Julie Leuzinger; The UNT Libraries Information Fluency Initiative Curriculum Mapping Project with Greg Hardin; Management Workshop Series for Public Services Librarians with Mary Ann Venner. She is currently working on an extensive research project, titled “Moving Toward a Praxis of Zen Librarianship: Expanding Librarianship with Mindfulness.” She presented a poster on this topic at the 2017 Texas Library Association Conference. She also continues research on Irish mythology and Celtic spirituality; pagan decadence in weird and Gothic literature; and theories related to linguistic othering, power, violence. Her aim is a humanities faculty-librarian position in the next few years.

MemberJeffrey Andrew Weinstock

I am professor of English at Central Michigan University, where I teach a range of courses on American literature and popular culture, and I am an associate editor for The Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts. Born in Washington, DC and raised in Maryland, I earned my BA in English from the University of Pennsylvania, my MA in American literature from the George Washington University, and my PhD from the interdisciplinary Program in the Human Sciences at the George Washington University.  I have taught at CMU since 2001. My research focuses on the “cultural work” performed by the Gothic in its various manifestations—the ways in which Gothic texts and practices give shape to culturally specific anxieties and desires. This interest has led me from considering, for example, how nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American women made use of Gothic conventions as a strategy to express discontentment with their circumscribed roles to thinking about the ways contemporary monsters reflect shifting American fears and aspirations.

MemberJesse Alemán

Jesse Alemán is a professor of English and the Director of Literature at the University of New Mexico, where he teaches nineteenth-century American and U.S. Latina/o literary and cultural histories. He also offers classes on the C19 American gothic; southwestern literature and film; and Chicana/o horror. He holds the title of Presidential Teaching Fellow, a distinction awarded for his critical pedagogy at a Hispanic Serving Institution.

MemberKaren Grumberg

Karen Grumberg is Associate Professor in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies and the Program in Comparative Literature at the University of Texas at Austin, where she also serves as Director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. She is the author of Space and Place in Contemporary Hebrew Literature (Syracuse UP, 2011). Her second book, Hebrew Gothic: History and the Poetics of Persecution, is currently under review.

MemberTeresa Goddu

Teresa A. Goddu is Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Vanderbilt University. She is a specialist in nineteenth-century American literature and culture. Her research and teaching focus on slavery and antislavery, race and American culture, the history of the book, genre studies, as well as print, material and visual culture. She is the author of Gothic America: Narrative, History, and Nation (Columbia University Press) and Selling Antislavery: Abolition and Mass Media in Antebellum America (University of Pennsylvania Press). Her recent research focuses on the environmental humanities. She is writing a book-length study of contemporary U.S. climate fiction and she curates a climate fiction collection at the Vanderbilt library.