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Membernispero

I am a scholar of U.S. and Latin American literature and culture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In particular, my first book and my current projects reflect a transnational approach to the cultural history of capitalism. They address a common broad question: how are our local and national identities shaped by and through popular economic and political narratives? My book, A Cultural History of Underdevelopment: Latin America in the U.S. Imagination (University of Virginia Press, 2016) explores how Americans have mapped the hemisphere from the mid-19th century to the end of the Cold War in terms of an economic geography in which the United States was a rich nation among poor ones. The most common term for this geography and condition of poverty has been “underdevelopment,” a term from the social sciences that has also drawn on cultural generalizations about the origins and the spaces of poverty. Since I arrived at Wayne State, I have also taught and writen about the history and culture of Detroit, especially in the ways its image circulates outside the city–as the Motor City, Motown, the Arsenal of Democracy, and the city of ruins. My new project, Keywords for the Age of Austerity, is an evolving online work of historical etymology and cultural criticism. I trace the history of economic concepts in the mass media, uncovering the history and common use of popular terms like “accountability,” “entrepreneur,” and “innovation.”

MemberCaitlin Duffy

I’m an English literature Ph.D. candidate at Stony Brook University. My work focuses on 19th century American gothic literature and contemporary horror films. I’m currently working on my dissertation, which traces a thread between early American gothic fiction and contemporary American horror films through the dual lens of 19th century American liberalism and present-day American neoliberalism. In particular, I’m interested in the ways that these two modes of reasoning depict what it means to be American, as well as the ways that 19th-century American gothic texts and contemporary American horror films challenge, support, and subvert these depictions through the deployment of repeated figures and environments. Outside of my academic life, I’m a podcast aficionado, tea addict, and novice yogi. Some of my favorite days are spent going to the theatre.

MemberChristine Yao

Christine “Xine” Yao is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of British Columbia in the Department of English. She works on intersections of affect, race, gender, and sexuality in relation to science and law through long 19th century American literature. Her research has been published in J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists and American Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion. She is an award-winning instructor of literature, culture, and writing. She completed her Ph.D.  in English at Cornell University in 2016 with minors in American Studies and Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Dr. Yao’s postdoctoral, PhD, and MA work has been funded by competitive national grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Her archival research has been supported by travel grants to the American Antiquarian Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the College of the Library of Physicians of Philadelphia. Additional training thanks to the Center for American Visual Culture, the Futures of American Studies Institute at Dartmouth College, and the LGBT Leadership Academy at Cornell in Washington. For further information and CV, please see http://www.christineyao.com 

MemberEric S. Hood

Dr. Eric S. Hood specialize in cultural theory and British Romanticism, particularly British epic poetry in the 18th and 19th century. He is a Founding Editor at the Digital Mitford and a Core Faculty Member in the Digital Humanities at Michigan State University, where he teaches first-year writing.

MemberAnnie Rehill

Areas of special interest: Francophone Canadian literature, Francophone Antillean literature, French literature, ecocriticism, humanities, history, intersections between cultures and languages, creative writing. PhD, Modern French Studies. Coureurs de bois and voyageurs, 17th–19th century Canadian backwoodsmen known for their independence of spirit and connections with Amerindians and the wilderness. Canadian Métis culture.

MemberSarah Robbins

Dr. Sarah Ruffing Robbins teaches American Literature at TCU. Her 9 academic books address topics ranging from gendered authorship to race relations, from social literacy practices to public pedagogy. Sarah has (co)directed numerous humanities projects, including Domesticating the Secondary Canon, Making American Literatures and Keeping and Creating American Communities. Her recent Learning Legacies: Archive to Action through Women’s Cross-Cultural Teaching promotes cultural stewardship grounded in historical study as a pathway to community-building. Several previous publications (Writing America, Writing Our Communities, and Teachers’ Writing Groups) grew out of collaborative programs for educators. Other single-author projects include the CHOICE-award-winning Managing Literacy, Mothering America and The Cambridge Introduction to Harriet Beecher Stowe. Sarah also co-edited Teaching Transatlanticism (with Linda Hughes), Nellie Arnott’s Writings on Angola, 1905-1913 (with Ann Pullen), and Bridging Cultures: International Women Faculty Transforming the US Academy (with Sabine Smith and Federica Santini). Winner of a Governor’s Humanities Award, she focuses much of her work on preparing students for public humanities activism. She’s also at work with a team of scholars preparing an anthology of primary texts for studying transatlantic Anglophone print culture of the long 19th century.

MemberMichael Saman

My research focuses on German literary and intellectual history of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and on intersections of German and Africana intellectual culture.
My current work in progress includes a book manuscript on classical German thought in W.E.B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk; studies of the reception of Kant in Goethe’s late literary and scientific work; a study of intertextuality and systemic closure in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit; a comparative methodological study of the thought of Goethe and of Lévi-Strauss; and a contextualization of the work of Kraftwerk within postwar German politics and aesthetics.
I have been a fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Fulbright Foundation, and have taught at Princeton University, UCLA, Brown University, the College of William & Mary, and the College of the Holy Cross.

MemberMarissa K. López

I am an Associate Professor of English and Chicana/o Studies at UCLA, and I study Chicanx literature from the 19th century to the present with an emphasis on 19th century Mexican California. I’ve written two books: Chicano Nations (NYU 2011) is about nationalism and Chicanx literature from the early-1800s to post-9/11; Racial Immanence (forthcoming from NYU) explores uses of the body and affect in Chicanx cultural production. My articles have appeared in leading journals such as American Literary History, Arizona Quarterly, and Áztlan (and several that don’t begin with the letter “A”).  I am the Vice President of the Latina/o Studies Association and the chair of the Modern Language Association’s prize committee for the best book in Chicana/o and Latina/o Literary and Cultural Studies.  I’m also past chair of both the MLA’s Executive Committee on Chicana/o Literature and its Committee on the Literature of People of Color of the US and Canada, and a past Director of UCLA’s Chicano Studies Research Center as well as past chair of UCLA’s Committee on Diversity and Equal Opportunity. In the English Department at UCLA I’m currently the Director of Professionalization, in which capacity I work jointly with the Director of Academic Placement to develop professionalization programs for graduate students at every stage of the PhD program.