Search

MemberMarina Gerzic

ECR based at UWA. Lover of all things Shakespearean. I work for the ARC Centre for Excellence for the History of Emotions as its National Administrative Officer. I also work as the Executive Administrator for the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Inc., as the editorial assistant for the academic journals Parergon and Shakespeare Bulletin and for the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at The University of Western Australia in both research and administrative roles.   My current research project examines popular culture depictions of Richard III, and analyses how these works interpret and visually embody Richard and his disability. My research explores and analyses the clash between Early Modern performance texts and youth culture/popular culture, in particular the appropriation of Shakespeare by youth culture/popular culture and the expropriation of youth culture in the manufacture and marketing of Shakespeare. I have taught courses in Shakespeare, film adaptation, and Australian literature. My doctoral work concerned millennial Shakespearean cinematic adaptations, specifically the intersection of Shakespeare and popular culture, as well as the function of music within these films. As well as the analysis of film versions of Shakespeare, I am also interested in how Shakespeare is adapted in new media, such as music, advertising, television, graphic novels and children’s literature. In particular, I am interested at how Australian authors adapt Shakespeare for children via a variety of forms and genres.

MemberKarin Anneliese Wurst

Karin A. Wurst, is Professor of German Literature and Culture. She received her Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. Her books have focused on representations of the family, women’s drama, cultural consumption in 18th Century-Germany, and J.M.R. Lenz : Das Schlaraffenland verwilderter Ideen. Narrative Strategien in den Prosaerzählungen von J. M. R. Lenz (Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2014); Fabricating Pleasure: Fashion, Entertainment, and Consumption in Germany (1780-1830), German Literary Theory and Cultural Studies (Wayne State University Press, 2005). Karin A. Wurst and Alan Leidner, Unpopular Virtues: J. M. R. Lenz and the Critics. A Reception History (Columbia, S.C.: Camden House, 1999). Edited and introduced Eleonore Thon’s “Adelheit von Rastenberg.” Texts and Translation Series. (New York: MLA, 1996). Edited and introduced J.M.R. Lenz als Alternative? Positionsanalysen zum 200. Todestag (Köln, Wien, Weimar: Böhlau, 1992). Frau und Drama im achtzehnten Jahrhundert (Köln, Wien: Böhlau, 1991). “Familiale Liebe ist die wahre Gewalt.” Zur Repräsentation der Familie in Lessings dramatischem Werk” (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1988). Her articles focus on 17th and 18th century Germany and issues of gender, cultural and aesthetic representation. The have appeared in German Quarterly, Daphnis, German Studies Review, Lessing Yearbook, Text + Kritik, Seminar, Women in German Yearbook, Goethe Yearbook, Lenz Jahrbuch.  Her teaching interests include literary and cultural theories, feminist theory, women’s literature and material culture. From 2006 to 2014 she served as Dean of the College of Arts and Letters at MSU; she served as Special Advisor to the Provost on Intercultural Learning and Student Engagement (2014-2016).  

MemberWhitney Chappell

At UTSA, I teach classes on language and gender, bilingualism, sociolinguistics, Spanish phonetics and phonology, introduction to Spanish linguistics, and language and identity, among many others. My teaching philosophy is grounded in engaged, active student learning where the classroom is a fun, dynamic, and student-centered environment. In addition to sparking my students’ interest in linguistics, my goal is to help students become more inquisitive individuals who are capable of thinking critically inside and outside of the classroom. I also conduct research, and my work has been published in Language Variation and Change, The Journal of Voice, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics, Spanish in Context, Heritage Language Journal, Hispanic Studies Review, Hispania, and many other peer-reviewed journals and edited volumes. In my research I am particularly fascinated by the nexus of sound and social meaning, and my research attempts to answer the following questions: How do we index our social affiliations through our use of phonetic variables? How do we use them to create closeness to or distance from certain groups? How much social information do we pick up on when we hear someone produce a particular variant? My publications delve into these questions in Central American Spanish and, more recently, in native and heritage Mexican Spanish in the United States. In pursuing these questions, my work sheds light on how phonetic variables help us construct and negotiate social identities and social memberships in Spanish. Finally, I contribute to my university through service work at the department, college, and university levels. My philosophy of service is simple: through leadership, organization, and teamwork my colleagues and I can work together to continually improve our university.

MemberNicole Bonino

  I am Italian, from Turin. I am a PhD candidate and teaching assistant at the University of Virginia. My area of specialty is Latin American literature, with a comparative focus on Migration Studies and an interdisciplinary interest in the field of Environmental Humanities. Within the theoretical framework of ecocriticism, my research examines the reasons why people emigrate, the ways in which they modify space and culture, and the rhetorical and metaphorical ways in which the urban and oceanic landscapes are represented in migratory literature. I am currently a fellow of the Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation, the Center for the Americas, the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, and the Hispanic Honor Society Sigma Delta Pi. My doctoral dissertation, entitled Hacerse la América: hibridismos imaginados en la literatura migratoria ítalo-argentina [Hacerse la América: Imagined Hybridisms in Italo-Argentinian Migratory Literature] focuses on the diasporic movements related to the South-South axis involving, specifically, the Italian migration to Argentina. While giving voice to emarginated communities, this project offers a critical paradigm for understanding past and contemporary migratory phenomena.

MemberElena Machado Sáez

Elena Machado Sáez is a Professor of English at Bucknell University, where she teaches courses on contemporary American, US Latino/a, and Caribbean diaspora literatures. She earned her PhD in English at SUNY Stony Brook and her undergraduate degree in English at Fordham University. Dr. Machado Sáez recently completed an essay offering an MFA teleology for US Latinx literature, two essays on Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musicals, In the Heights and Hamilton, and is embarking on a research project comparing Miranda’s self-representation and modes of affiliation on Twitter to that of other Latinx writers. She is author of Market Aesthetics: The Purchase of the Past in Caribbean Diasporic Fiction (University of Virginia Press 2015). The book analyzes historical fiction by Caribbean diasporic authors in Britain, Canada and the United States as part of a global literary trend that addresses the relationship between ethnic writers and their audiences. Machado Sáez argues that the novels address the problematic of intimacy and ethics in relation to readership by focusing on how gender and sexuality represent sites of contestation in the formulation of Caribbean identity and history. Dr. Machado Sáez is also coauthor of The Latino/a Canon and the Emergence of Post-Sixties Literature (Palgrave Macmillan 2007), which discusses how Cuban-American, Dominican-American, and Puerto Rican literatures challenge established ideas about the relationship between politics and the market.

MemberPatrick Whitmarsh

I’m a second-year PhD candidate with interests in the 20th-century American novel, science fiction, and other brands of speculative fiction. I’m also interested in the intersection of literature and science, as well as the new speculative developments in continental philosophy.In addition to my blog on science fiction and speculative theory, I also publish occasionally on my other blog: http://borrowingfromthefuture.blogspot.com/

MemberEleanor Mary Boudreau

Eleanor Mary Boudreau holds a B.A. in English from Harvard College and a M.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. She spent four years working as a reporter for the NPR member-station in Memphis, WKNO-FM, before earning her M.F.A. in poetry at the University of Houston. She is currently a Ph.D. student at Florida State University and has worked extensively on elegy, Wilfred Owen, and Thom Gunn. She presented at a Symposium on Gunn’s work held at Berkeley in December of 2016.