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MemberSamuel Amago

I teach courses on modern and contemporary Spanish literary history, cinema and culture and welcome inquiries from colleagues interested in film theory, narrative fiction, material culture, trash, comics and visual studies in Spain and Latin America.

MemberGeoffrey Way

Geoffrey Way is the Manager of Publishing Futures for the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. His research focuses on how digital technologies shape Shakespere’s cultural relevance with audiences through both marketing and performance. His work has appeared in Shakespeare BulletinBorrowers and LendersThe Journal of Narrative TheoryHumanities (co-authored with Devori Kimbro and Michael Noschka), and the collections Early Modern Studies After the Digital Turn and The Shakespeare User: Critical and Creative Appropriations in a Networked Culture (co-authored with Courtney Lehmann). He is currently working on his book, tentatively titled Digital Shakespeares and the Performance of Relevance, and co-editing two collections, Shakespeare, Appropriation, and Power (Working Title) with Vanessa Corredera, and Shakespeare at the Intersection of Performance and Appropration with Louise Geddes and Kathryn Vomero Santos. He also is co-creator and co-host of the podcast Remixing the Humanities with Devori Kimbro and Michael Noschka.

MemberSusan Hollis Merritt

I earned my BA with Honors from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and my MA and PhD in English from Indiana University Bloomington.  My PhD dissertation, “Fantasy behind Play: A Study of Emotional Responses to Harold Pinter’s The Birthday Party, The Caretaker and The Homecoming,” initiated my work in reader-response oriented theory, criticism, and pedagogy and developed into my broader scholarly and pedagogical interests in theory and criticism. For several decades I have taught courses in English and theater at universities and colleges in the United States and engaged in scholarly pursuits here and abroad. My research on the criticism of Harold Pinter’s work advanced significantly when I participated as a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow in the NEH Summer Seminar New Directions in Literary Study, directed by Professor Ralph Cohen, at the University of Virginia, in Charlottesville. Supported by an NEH Fellowship for College Teachers, I began my work on my book Pinter in Play: Critical Strategies and the Plays of Harold Pinter (1990; Duke UP, 1995). Following the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia, Harold Pinter’s support for Václav Havel, and subsequent political developments in the Czech Republic (discussed in chapter 8 on “Cultural Politics” and updated in my preface to the paperback edition of Pinter in Play), I studied Czech as a visiting scholar in the Institute for European Studies at Cornell University and traveled to Prague multiple times to do research on Czech productions of contemporary plays by Pinter and other playwrights writing in English. During the spring of 1997, I was a Fulbright Senior Scholar, hosted by the Czech Theatre Institute, and a research associate at Charles University, in Prague.  I also made many trips to London, to do research in the Harold Pinter Archive at the British Library and to attend theatrical productions and related events pertaining to Pinter and other playwrights. My teaching and research, including my regular participation in MLA Annual Conventions, led to my becoming a charter member of the Society for Critical Exchange (founded in 1975) and a founding Life Member of the Harold Pinter Society (founded in 1986; now called the International Harold Pinter Society), both Allied Organizations of the MLA. As founding Bibliographical Editor of The Pinter Review, I compiled the “Harold Pinter Bibliography” from 1987 through 2011, when it was published in conjunction with the Pinter Society by the University of Tampa and the University of Tampa Press. Having participated in MLA workshops on Digital Humanities (see my profile on DH Commons, linked below in “Projects”), I am exploring the feasibility of developing a searchable digital database for my “Harold Pinter Bibliography” compiled for The Pinter Review. A selected list of my publications (including 14 installments of the bibliography) appears below and in the CV section of my (archived) website, which I hope to update and re-locate to a new hosting service in the future. My academic interests include: Dramatic literature, criticism, and theory; Global politics and the cultural impact of contemporary drama and media; Human rights issues pertaining to cultural studies; Digital pedagogy and scholarship; Archival studies; and Critical bibliography.

MemberEleanor Boudreau

Eleanor Boudreau is a poet who has worked as dry-cleaner and as a radio reporter. Her first book, Earnest, Earnest? (Pitt Poetry Series, 2020), won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared in American Poetry Review, Tin House, Barrow Street, Waxwing, Willow Springs, FIELD, Copper Nickel, and other journals. Currently, she is a Kingsbury Graduate Fellow and Instructor of Record at Florida State University, where she is finishing her Ph.D. 

MemberRenata Kobetts Miller

Renata Kobetts Miller is professor of English at the City College of New York, where she also serves as Deputy Dean of Humanities and the Arts.  Her book The Victorian Actress in the Novel and on the Stage was published by Edinburgh University Press in November.  She is also the author of a book on adaptations of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and her work on Victorian fiction and theater has appeared in MLQ, BRANCH, and the Oxford Handbook of Adaptation Studies, among other places.  She is currently working on two projects: one on the Independent Theatre Society of the 1890s, and the other on interdisciplinarity in the Victorian novel.  

MemberJames Fitzmaurice

My present research focuses on connections between the visual arts and Margaret Cavendish’s poetry, fiction, and drama. My sense of visual arts is derived from research into painting, prints, and drawings that were available for Cavendish to see when she lived in Antwerp during the 1650s and in England in the 1660s. She thought of herself as a woman who painted in words and sometimes commented on art as it was collected for and displayed in country houses. She and her husband wrote within (and against) traditions of the representation of art and country houses found in the writings of William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson.

MemberBrian Croxall

I’m Assistant Research Professor of Digital Humanities in Brigham Young University’s Office of Digital Humanities. I imagine, design, and manage digital scholarship projects in collaboration with faculty, colleagues, and students. I also teach classes in our Digital Humanities and Technology minor. I’m passionate about integrating digital approaches into pedagogy. Prior to coming to BYU, I worked at the Centers for Digital Scholarship at both Brown University and Emory University. I was Digital Humanities Librarian at Brown and Digital Humanities Strategist and Lecturer of English at Emory. At both schools, I managed large, multi-year, grant-funded projects in collaboration with faculty, librarians, graduate students, and other staff. These projects included the digitization of previously classified documents about Brazil / US relations; a digital edition of and edited collection about a 17th-century book of alchemy; the paved-over landscape and history of the Battle of Atlanta; the literary networks of writers in Northern Ireland; and the relationship among poets and editors in mid-century modern American poetry. I completed my Ph.D. at Emory University, investigating the relationships among technology, media, and psychological trauma. After that, I taught modern and contemporary American literature as well as courses on media studies, digital culture, and war fiction for a year at Emory and another year at Clemson University. I then became Emory’s first CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow and Emerging Technologies Librarian. Somewhere in there, I co-edited both a book and a journal issue on steampunk, edited a cluster at #Alt-Academy, and wrote for the group blog ProfHacker. I am the elected Secretary of the international Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations, an elected member of the Modern Language Association‘s Delegate Assembly, and an appointed member of the MLA’s Program Committee. I am a past member of the Executive Councils of the MLA and the Association for Computers and the Humanities. I use Twitter on occasion and track my publications with ORCID.

MemberCaroline Wilkinson

I received my MFA at Washington University in Saint Louis and my Ph.D. in English, with Creative-Writing dissertation, at University of Tennessee where I am a post-doctoral lecturer. I study poetics and the Victorian Novel with an emphasis on place, the environment, and labor. My articles have appeared in Dickens Studies Annual and George Eliot-George Henry Lewes Studies. My fiction and poetry explore the rural landscape and labor, subjects I see as underrepresented in contemporary writing.