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MemberRenata Kobetts Miller

Renata Kobetts Miller is professor of English at the City College of New York, where she also serves as Deputy Dean of Humanities and the Arts.  Her book The Victorian Actress in the Novel and on the Stage was published by Edinburgh University Press in November.  She is also the author of a book on adaptations of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and her work on Victorian fiction and theater has appeared in MLQ, BRANCH, and the Oxford Handbook of Adaptation Studies, among other places.  She is currently working on two projects: one on the Independent Theatre Society of the 1890s, and the other on interdisciplinarity in the Victorian novel.  

MemberJames Fitzmaurice

My present research focuses on connections between the visual arts and Margaret Cavendish’s poetry, fiction, and drama. My sense of visual arts is derived from research into painting, prints, and drawings that were available for Cavendish to see when she lived in Antwerp during the 1650s and in England in the 1660s. She thought of herself as a woman who painted in words and sometimes commented on art as it was collected for and displayed in country houses. She and her husband wrote within (and against) traditions of the representation of art and country houses found in the writings of William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson.

MemberCaroline Wilkinson

I received my MFA at Washington University in Saint Louis and my Ph.D. in English, with Creative-Writing dissertation, at University of Tennessee where I am a post-doctoral lecturer. I study poetics and the Victorian Novel with an emphasis on place, the environment, and labor. My articles have appeared in Dickens Studies Annual and George Eliot-George Henry Lewes Studies. My fiction and poetry explore the rural landscape and labor, subjects I see as underrepresented in contemporary writing.

MemberJennifer A. Lorden

I study the earliest English poetry and how its conventions differ from, and yet set the stage for, those that follow. My current research focuses on religious culture and saints’ lives, affect and emotion, and poetic narratives of history. My book project, Mixed Feelings: Forms of Devotion in Early English Poetry, explores how deeply felt religious devotion, what is known as affective piety, appears centuries earlier than is commonly thought.