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MemberBrian Croxall

I’m Assistant Research Professor of Digital Humanities in Brigham Young University’s Office of Digital Humanities. I imagine, design, and manage digital scholarship projects in collaboration with faculty, colleagues, and students. I also teach classes in our Digital Humanities and Technology minor. I’m passionate about integrating digital approaches into pedagogy. Prior to coming to BYU, I worked at the Centers for Digital Scholarship at both Brown University and Emory University. I was Digital Humanities Librarian at Brown and Digital Humanities Strategist and Lecturer of English at Emory. At both schools, I managed large, multi-year, grant-funded projects in collaboration with faculty, librarians, graduate students, and other staff. These projects included the digitization of previously classified documents about Brazil / US relations; a digital edition of and edited collection about a 17th-century book of alchemy; the paved-over landscape and history of the Battle of Atlanta; the literary networks of writers in Northern Ireland; and the relationship among poets and editors in mid-century modern American poetry. I completed my Ph.D. at Emory University, investigating the relationships among technology, media, and psychological trauma. After that, I taught modern and contemporary American literature as well as courses on media studies, digital culture, and war fiction for a year at Emory and another year at Clemson University. I then became Emory’s first CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow and Emerging Technologies Librarian. Somewhere in there, I co-edited both a book and a journal issue on steampunk, edited a cluster at #Alt-Academy, and wrote for the group blog ProfHacker. I am the elected Secretary of the international Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations, an elected member of the Modern Language Association‘s Delegate Assembly, and an appointed member of the MLA’s Program Committee. I am a past member of the Executive Councils of the MLA and the Association for Computers and the Humanities. I use Twitter on occasion and track my publications with ORCID.

Memberbonnie lenore kyburz

An aspiring minimalist, I do all the things! My many roles constellate within a clarifying praxis of supporting creative vision. I teach writing and rhetoric with an emphasis in digital multimodality. I enjoy making short films as digital scholarship. My book on all of this is due out later this year from the #writing series, Colorado State University Open Press. I’ve listed my disciplinary identitification @ Left. Thankfully, the field in which I identify my presence, Rhetoric and Composition, is gloriously capacious. Within the field, I’ve found ways of engaging a range of studies and practices that invite me to explore my interests in:

  • Affect
  • Composition
  • Design
  • Digital Media
  • DIY Digital Filmmaking
  • Film
  • Multimodality
  • Performance
  • Rhetoric
  • Visual Rhetoric
  • Writing Program Administration

MemberElizabeth A Wilson

Elizabeth A Wilson is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor in the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Emory University (Atlanta, USA).  In Fall 2019 she will be Visiting Whitney J. Oates Fellow in the Council of the Humanities and the Department of English, Princeton University.   She has been an ARC Research Fellow at the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales. She has held fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard.  She is currently working on a co-authored introduction to the affect theory of Silvan Tomkins (with Adam Frank, University of British Columbia).

MemberJohn E. Drabinski

John E. Drabinski is Charles Hamilton Houston 1915 Professor of Black Studies in the Department of Black Studies at Amherst College. In addition to authoring four books, most recently Glissant and the Middle Passage: Philosophy, Beginning, Abyss (Minnesota, 2019) and Levinas and the Postcolonial: Race, Nation, Other (Edinburgh, 2012), he has written over three dozen articles on Africana theory and French philosophy, and has edited books and journal issues on Frantz Fanon, Jean-Luc Godard, Emmanuel Levinas, Édouard Glissant, and the question of political reconciliation. He is currently finalizing a translation and critical introduction to Jean Bernabé, Patrick Chamoiseau, and Raphael Confiant’s Éloge de la créolité, and is completing a book-length study of the philosophical dimensions of James Baldwin’s non-fiction entitled ‘So Unimaginable a Price’: Baldwin and the Black Atlantic.

MemberNatalie Crohn Schmitt

Commedia dell’artePerformance StudiesTheatre Theory, Performance Philosophy, John CageWilliam Butler YeatsTheatre HistoryTheatre StudiesMedieval DramaAudience ParticipationAristotleA Chorus LineDramaEarly Modern English dramaChildren’s Pretend PlayChildren’s TheatreEducational TheatreImprovisationOedipusMedieval ArtMedieval TheatreRenaissance dramaSpalding GrayStanislávskiTom StoppardTheatre CriticismTheatre and LandscapeTheatre PhotographyTwentieth Century Drama, and The Wooster group