• This essay considers the use that twenty-first-century fictionalized cancer narratives make of Shakespeare’s words, the Shakespeare industry, and editorial and textual apparatuses to trope the ambiguous status of the post-millennial cancer patient. In the so-called “women’s novel” The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown, the genre thriller What Time Devours, by A.J. Hartley, the best-selling young adult novel The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green, and the post-modern literary novel The Tragedy of Arthur, by Arthur Phillips, lines from Shakespeare (often deliberately mis-appropriated or quoted out of context) figure both cancers and fictionality itself. These novels variously deploy Shakespearean words, plays, and performances to evoke the possibility of transforming what Arthur Frank’s classic text on illness and narrative, The Wounded Storyteller, calls the “chaos narrative” into more mannered literary forms.