About

I’m an independent researcher, based in York, UK. My work explores the tensions between popular and ‘high’ culture that shaped the literary landscape of twentieth-century Britain, with a particular focus on the disruptive role of parody and satire in this contest of values. My first book, Rethinking G.K. Chesterton and Literary Modernism: Parody, Performance, and Popular Culture, was published by Routledge in 2017. I am currently working on my second monograph, also under contract with Routledge: The Parodic Devil in British Post-Enlightenment Culture: Inscribing Pandemonium.

Education

Durham University, 2010—2013
PhD in English Literature, funded by a Durham Doctoral Studentship

University of York, 2007—2008
MA by Research in English Literature, funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council

Sheffield Hallam University, 2000—2004
BA (hons) degree in English Studies

Publications

Books:

(forthcoming) The Parodic Devil in British Post-Enlightenment Culture: Inscribing Pandemonium. New York: Routledge, 2021.

Rethinking G.K. Chesterton and Literary Modernism: Parody, Performance, and Popular Culture. New York: Routledge, 2017.

Essay collection:

Aphoristic Modernity: 1890 to the Present. Ed. Kostas Boyiopoulos and Michael Shallcross. Leiden: Brill, 2019.

Journal articles:

(forthcoming) ‘Demonising Decadence: Parodic Diabolism in Max Beerbohm, G.K. Chesterton, and Joseph Conrad’. Volupté, 2, 2019.

‘Parody and Identity in Chesterton’. Essays in Criticism, 66.4, 2016 (pp.444-65).

‘The Bentley Diaries: A New Insight into E.C. Bentley’s Influence on G.K. Chesterton’s Life and Work’. English 65.250, 2016 (pp.238-266).

‘G.K. Chesterton’s Assimilation of Fin de Siècle Voices in The Man Who Was Thursday: The Dialogic Sensibility’. English Literature in Transition, 59.3, 2016 (pp.320-43).

‘“This odd game called war”: The Ethics of Game-Playing in the War Writing of H.G. Wells, G.K. Chesterton, and Wyndham Lewis’. The Wellsian, 38, 2016 (pp.41-56).

‘“The Parodist’s Game”: Scrutiny of Cultural Play in Jonathan Coe’s What a Carve Up!’ Adaptation, 9.2, 2016 (pp.123-41).

Book chapters:

(forthcoming): ‘“I saw a sign that said ‘Drink Canada Dry’”: Alcoholic Epigrams, Modern Marketing, and the Value of Moderation.’ Aphoristic Modernity: 1890 to the Present. Ed. Kostas Boyiopoulos and Michael Shallcross. Leiden: Brill, 2019.

(forthcoming): ‘A Large Mouth Shown to a Dentist: G.K. Chesterton’s Surgical Parodying of T.S. Eliot’. Literary and Cultural Alternatives to Modernism: Unsettling Presences. Ed. Kostas Boyiopoulos, Anthony Patterson, and Mark Sandy. New York: Routledge, 2019.

‘British fiction, 1930-45’, The Year’s Work in English Studies Vol.95, 2016 (pp.972-86).

‘British fiction, 1930-45’, The Year’s Work in English Studies Vol.94, 2015 (pp.855-88).

‘British fiction, 1930-45’, The Year’s Work in English Studies Vol.93, 2014 (pp.839-52).

‘A Playground for Adults: Urban Recreation in Chesterton’s Detective Fiction.’ G.K. Chesterton, London and Modernity. Ed. Matthew Beaumont and Matthew Ingleby. London: Bloomsbury, 2013 (pp.157-82).

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