• In the centuries since William Shakespeare’s death, numerous stage and, more recently, film and television adaptations of his work have emerged to inspire, comfort, and provoke audiences in far-flung corners of the globe. As early as 1619, for example, Hamlet was performed in colonial Indonesia to entertain European expatriates. In 1845, U.S. Army officers staged Othello in Corpus Christi, Texas, as a distraction from the run-up to the Mexican-American War. Supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Alabama Shakespeare Festival toured its production of Macbeth to several key U.S. military bases in 2004. The gender roles have also been taken for a spin, notably in Phyllida Lloyd’s all-female production of Julius Caesar and Henry IV (Donmar Warehouse, London, 2012 and 2014). Set in a women’s prison, the cross-gender performance stirred heated discussions. Meanwhile, rehearsing The Comedy of Errors in Kabul and eventually performingat the Globe Theatre in London during the 2012 Olympics helped the Roy-e-Sabs Company cope with persecution from the Talibans and take shelter from harsh Afghan politics.