• In his recent monograph, Marvin Carlson develops the premise first established in The Haunted Stage: Theatre as Memory Machine (2003): that theatre capitalizes on the memories of audiences to provide opportunities for meaning. The past lives of objects and the previous roles of actors ghost performances that follow. In this new monograph, Carlson argues that this hauntological feature is crucial when examining the tension between reality and imitation—a primary concern of modern and postmodern theatre. Using Hamlet’s allusion to Socrates as an organizing conceit, each chapter considers the theatre’s turn away from mimesis to the appropriation of the “real,” including borrowing words, the body of the actor, the affordances of physical surroundings, the prop, and, eventually, the audience itself.