• This essay calls for a reflection on the links between literature, activism, and social change in the Hispanic Caribbean, privileging certain interventions led by women, who have contributed to the defense of better living conditions and a more equitable social pact. Taking into account the diversity and mobility that characterizes the Caribbean region, this reflection begins by examining the autonomous feminist organizations that emerged in the 70s in Puerto Rico and then moves towards the work of questioning history posed by the poetry of Aida Cartagena Portalatín in the Dominican Republic, concluding with a brief review of the work done by feminist criticism developed in Cuba in the 90s. Examining the movements that managed to renew and invigorate the struggle for social improvements and reflecting on the work of writers who invited us to imagine a fairer society contribute to establishing a reading of the cultural history of the Hispanic Caribbean from the dynamics of gender. Also, this reflection calls for a critical re-examination of the premises and standards from which we interpret as citizen participation and activism, with the aim that it can serve as inspiration when creating strategies that might lead us to new achievements.