Division Sessions at the MLA

2 replies, 2 voices Last updated by  Lisa Berglund 4 years, 9 months ago
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  • #2602

    Rivka Swenson
    Participant
    @rivkaswenson

    Dear All, in light of Deidre Lynch’s post on the Commons site in the “Later Eighteenth Century” group, in which she helpfully listed the sessions for that Division and encouraged all MLA-attending members to attend as many of the Division sessions as possible, I’m posting here the information about the sessions for “Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century.” As Deidre pointed out, the members of both Divisions came forward in droves, in recent months, to post on the Commons site and to sign the circulated Open Letter & Petition. It would be great to see a robust attendance at the below sessions (as always, there will be a head-count), as a follow-up to all our colleagues’ articulate, well-reasoned explanations about why it makes sound scholarly and pedagogical sense to preserve the 2 Divisions.

     

    <b>MLA 2014 – Chicago</b>

    <b>Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature</b>

    <b> </b>

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”> </span></b>

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”>111. Rethinking the Place of the Novel in the History of Genre</span></b>

    <i>Thursday, 9 January3:30–4:45 p.m., Chicago F, Chicago Marriott</i>

    <b>Program arranged by the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature</b>

    <i>Presiding: </i>Wolfram Michael Schmidgen, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

    1. “Looking toward the Novel in the Country House Poem: Andrew Marvell’s ‘Upon Appleton House,'” Julie J. Park, Vassar Coll.

    2. “Skeptical Pilgrims of Spiritual Autobiography,” Sarah Mangin, Univ. of California, Berkeley

    3. “Early Fiction and the Genres of the Vernacular,” Janet L. Sorensen, Univ. of California, Berkeley

    <i>Responding: </i>Michael McKeon, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”> </span></b>

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”>331. Slavery and the Book Trade</span></b>

    <i>Friday, 10 January1:45–3:00 p.m., McHenry, Chicago Marriott</i>

    <b>Program arranged by the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature</b>

    <i>Presiding: </i>Sean D. Moore, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham

    1. “Phillis Wheatley in <i>The Liberator</i>: Love, Print, and Oppression,” Jennifer Thorn, Saint Anselm Coll.

    2. “Antislavery and the Book Trade,” Dorothy A. Couchman, Univ. of Virginia

    3. “The Paratexts of Race: Phillis Wheatley and the Print Culture of Abolitionism,” Paul Fess, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”> </span></b>

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”>465. Milton in the Long Restoration</span></b>

    <i>Saturday, 11 January8:30–9:45 a.m., Addison, Chicago Marriott</i>

    <b>Program arranged by the Milton Society of America and the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature</b>

    <i>Presiding: </i>Blair G. Hoxby, Stanford Univ.; Albert J. Rivero, Marquette Univ.

    1. “‘I Still Denied, Much Pleased to Hear You Sue’: Milton’s Eve as Restoration Coquette,” Laura Lunger Knoppers, Penn State Univ., University Park

    2. “Sad Conclusions: <i>Paradise Lost</i> and Political Genre,” David Harper, United States Military Acad.

    3. “The Battle over Milton Begins: John Dennis versus Alexander Pope, 1711–34,” Catherine Gimelli Martin, Univ. of Memphis

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”> </span></b>

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”>733. <i>Rape of the Lock</i> at Three Hundred</span></b>

    <i>Sunday, 12 January10:15–11:30 a.m., Armitage, Chicago Marriott</i>

    <b>Program arranged by the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature</b>

    <i>Presiding: </i>Catherine Elizabeth Ingrassia, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

    <i>Speakers:</i> Nicole Horejsi, Columbia Univ.; Matthew Reilly, Univ. of Texas, Austin; John J. Richetti, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Eugenia Zuroski Jenkins, McMaster Univ.

    <i>Session Description:</i>

    The roundtable offers new approaches to the poem, considers its role in the critical discourse surrounding the poet Pope, and explores its cultural persistence in scholarship and teaching.

     

     

     

    #2603

    Rivka Swenson
    Participant
    @rivkaswenson

    Since my previous post contains all the formatting marks (at least in my browser), and is thus largely illegible, I’m going to try again:

    <b>MLA 2014 – Chicago</b>

    <b>Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature</b>

    <b> </b>

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”> </span></b>

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”>111. Rethinking the Place of the Novel in the History of Genre</span></b>

    <i>Thursday, 9 January3:30–4:45 p.m., Chicago F, Chicago Marriott</i>

    <b>Program arranged by the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature</b>

    <i>Presiding: </i>Wolfram Michael Schmidgen, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

    1. “Looking toward the Novel in the Country House Poem: Andrew Marvell’s ‘Upon Appleton House,'” Julie J. Park, Vassar Coll.

    2. “Skeptical Pilgrims of Spiritual Autobiography,” Sarah Mangin, Univ. of California, Berkeley

    3. “Early Fiction and the Genres of the Vernacular,” Janet L. Sorensen, Univ. of California, Berkeley

    <i>Responding: </i>Michael McKeon, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”> </span></b>

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”>331. Slavery and the Book Trade</span></b>

    <i>Friday, 10 January1:45–3:00 p.m., McHenry, Chicago Marriott</i>

    <b>Program arranged by the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature</b>

    <i>Presiding: </i>Sean D. Moore, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham

    1. “Phillis Wheatley in <i>The Liberator</i>: Love, Print, and Oppression,” Jennifer Thorn, Saint Anselm Coll.

    2. “Antislavery and the Book Trade,” Dorothy A. Couchman, Univ. of Virginia

    3. “The Paratexts of Race: Phillis Wheatley and the Print Culture of Abolitionism,” Paul Fess, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”> </span></b>

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”>465. Milton in the Long Restoration</span></b>

    <i>Saturday, 11 January8:30–9:45 a.m., Addison, Chicago Marriott</i>

    <b>Program arranged by the Milton Society of America and the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature</b>

    <i>Presiding: </i>Blair G. Hoxby, Stanford Univ.; Albert J. Rivero, Marquette Univ.

    1. “‘I Still Denied, Much Pleased to Hear You Sue’: Milton’s Eve as Restoration Coquette,” Laura Lunger Knoppers, Penn State Univ., University Park

    2. “Sad Conclusions: <i>Paradise Lost</i> and Political Genre,” David Harper, United States Military Acad.

    3. “The Battle over Milton Begins: John Dennis versus Alexander Pope, 1711–34,” Catherine Gimelli Martin, Univ. of Memphis

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”> </span></b>

    <b><span style=”text-decoration: underline;”>733. <i>Rape of the Lock</i> at Three Hundred</span></b>

    <i>Sunday, 12 January10:15–11:30 a.m., Armitage, Chicago Marriott</i>

    <b>Program arranged by the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature</b>

    <i>Presiding: </i>Catherine Elizabeth Ingrassia, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

    <i>Speakers:</i> Nicole Horejsi, Columbia Univ.; Matthew Reilly, Univ. of Texas, Austin; John J. Richetti, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Eugenia Zuroski Jenkins, McMaster Univ.

    <i>Session Description:</i>

    The roundtable offers new approaches to the poem, considers its role in the critical discourse surrounding the poet Pope, and explores its cultural persistence in scholarship and teaching.

     

     

     

    #2604

    Lisa Berglund
    Participant
    @berglul

    <div>

    On behalf of the Lexicography Discussion Group, which has also been threatened with consolidation (and effective elimination), let me draw the attention of members of this group our session, which should be of interest:

    194. Title: Typography and Paratext in Early Modern Lexicography
    Friday, 10 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., O’Hare, Chicago Marriott
    Chair: Lindsay Rose Russell
    1. Christopher Devine, “The Letters as They Stand: A Typographical Analysis of Cawdrey’s A Table Alphabeticall”
    2. Robert DeMaria, “Johnson’s Editorial Lexicography”
    3. Lisa Berglund, “Reader Annotations in Early American Dictionaries”
    Respondent: Michael Hancher
    I have just been elected to the MLA Delegate Assembly–thanks to anyone in NYS who voted for me!–and will be an advocate for c18 studies.

    </div>

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