TOC: Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, vol.45, no.1 (March 2021)

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    Ulrich Tiedau
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    @uli_t

    Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies
    vol. 45, no. 1 (March 2021)

    Contents

    The Female Experience of Epidemics in the Early Modern Low Countries
    Daniel R. Curtis

    ‘I, Who Used to Serve as Jupiter’s Lightning on Earth’: Geeraerdt Brandt’s De Veinzende Torquatus (1645), Providentially Assigned Stadtholders and the Politics of Rational Deception
    Tom Laureys

    Thomas Johnson: the publisher as an agent of enlightenment
    Emil Rybczak

    The Development of Chinese Printers in the Dutch East Indies (1800–1900)
    Yiming Wang

    The Image of Hong Kong in Dutch Travel Writing
    Audrey Heijns

    The Feminism of Olive Schreiner and the Feminism of Aletta Jacobs: The Reception of Schreiner’s Woman and Labour in the Netherlands
    Małgorzata Drwal

    Book Review

    The Once and Future Fox: Reynard the Fox retold by Anne Louise Avery, Oxford, Bodleian Library, 2020
    Elsa Strietman

    Abstracts

    The Female Experience of Epidemics in the Early Modern Low Countries
    Daniel R. Curtis

    Recent literature has argued that women in parts of the early modern Low Countries experienced high levels of ‘agency’ and ‘independence’ – measured through ages and rates of marriage, participation in economic activities beyond the household, and the physical occupation of collective or public spaces. Epidemic disease outbreaks, however, also help bring into focus a number of female burdens and hardships in the early modern Low Countries, possibly born out of structural inequalities and vulnerabilities obscured from view in ‘normal times’, and which is supported by recent demographic research showing heightened adult female mortality compared to male during epidemics. For women, these included expectations of care both inside and outside the familial household, different forms of persecution, and social controls via authorities from above and internal regulation within communities from below – though these were also restrictions that women of course did not always passively accept, and sometimes violently rejected.

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2020.1840134

    ‘I, Who Used to Serve as Jupiter’s Lightning on Earth’: Geeraerdt Brandt’s De Veinzende Torquatus (1645), Providentially Assigned Stadtholders and the Politics of Rational Deception
    Tom Laureys

    This article aims to show that Geeraerdt Brandt’s popular revenge tragedy De veinzende Torquatus (1645) engages with the political debates concerning the rightful succession of monarchs based on primogeniture, and – be it in a grotesque, even parodic way – the Calvinistic belief that the Dutch stadtholders were God’s providential instruments, assigned to guide His chosen people. Subsequently, I show that the play offers a confrontation between two conflicting conceptions of power. The play’s eponymous protagonist holds what I call an intellectual (idealistic) conception of power, in which man’s rational faculty, including his capacity for rational deception, is all-decisive. This vision, though, clashes with the more physical (materialistic) conceptualization of power which Torquatus’s antagonist Noron upholds.

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2019.1615761

    Thomas Johnson: the publisher as an agent of enlightenment
    Emil Rybczak

    This article discusses the varied business practices of the eighteenth-century publisher Thomas Johnson. It develops our understanding of the Enlightenment, as experienced by its participants and as a historical phenomenon, by cataloguing Johnson’s creation and exploitation of communications and retail networks. His significant contribution to the publication of French works, held alongside his facilitation of Scottish engagement with the Republic of Letters, demonstrates the falsity of Jonathan Israel’s thesis that the Enlightenment was fundamentally divided between moderate and radical camps. Anne Goldgar’s work emphasises the importance of communication in defining the Enlightenment as a participatory community. Siskin and Warner characterise the Enlightenment as the material forms such communication took. Exploration of publishers’ status within this community, and their significance in controlling the means by which its ideas were disseminated, reveals their power in mediating who could participate in the Enlightenment, and the direction of its development.

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2017.1377372

    The Development of Chinese Printers in the Dutch East Indies (1800–1900)
    Yiming Wang

    The period of the Dutch East Indies holds a special position in the colonial history of the Low Countries. Of the many historical sub-disciplines that study this period, the history of printing has not been reviewed adequately. Very little research has been done on the history of Chinese printing in the Dutch East Indies. This article focuses exclusively on Chinese printing in the colony and discusses eleven printers active at the time, some of which were previously unknown to the academic community.

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2018.1551479

    The Image of Hong Kong in Dutch Travel Writing
    Audrey Heijns

    The travel accounts examined here were written by Dutch travellers to Hong Kong in the late-nineteenth to early-twentieth century. By applying the imagological approach, examples of ethnotypes and self-other oppositions found in the travel accounts are analysed. Findings show that the fact that most Dutch travelled from the Dutch East Indies (present-day Indonesia) influenced their observations of Hong Kong. This is particularly prominent, where writers compare the influence of the British in Hong Kong with that of the Dutch in the Dutch East Indies, in terms of facilities, infrastructure, activities and other aspects. Hence, this article sheds light on how the Dutch represent the image of Hong Kong through colonial eyes.

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2020.1821474

    The Feminism of Olive Schreiner and the Feminism of Aletta Jacobs: The Reception of Schreiner’s Woman and Labour in the Netherlands
    Małgorzata Drwal

    This article explores points of contact between Olive Schreiner and Aletta Jacobs, two prominent first-wave feminists, presenting a case study of cultural mobility from South Africa to the Netherlands. Utilizing the histoire croisée approach, this contribution discusses the reception of Olive Schreiner’s Woman and Labour in the Netherlands. It argues that the profile of Aletta Jacobs, who translated the text into Dutch, was decisive in forming Dutch public’s reactions to the book. Schreiner, however, an influential South African writer and social theorist, was a radical voice among both South African and European feminists and her social vision was not entirely compatible with Jacobs’s views. This article proposes that reviews of Schreiner’s book in Dutch socialist and feminist press reflect the tensions between these two movements which played out in Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and do not take into account Schreiner’s actual non-European perspective and her global approach to social processes where gender, class, and race function as intersecting concepts.

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2019.1693200

    Book Review

    The Once and Future Fox: Reynard the Fox, retold by Anne Louise Avery, Oxford, Bodleian Library, 2020
    Elsa Strietman

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2020.1859269

    • This topic was modified 2 weeks, 2 days ago by  Ulrich Tiedau.
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