Inspired by Michael Holquist’s challenge to the MLA to dialogue about the CCSI, what it means for us, and our relationship to secondary education, this is a space for discussion of standards, assessment, and our role in this process.

Public perception of common core standards

1 reply, 2 voices Last updated by  Cynthia Scheinberg 5 years, 10 months ago
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    Katina Rogers
    Participant
    @katinalynn

    Hello everyone,

    As a newcomer to this topic, I’d love to hear your comments on the ways the Common Core Standards Initiative is portrayed in media outside of higher ed circles. (Two recent examples: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/03/science/fewer-topics-covered-more-rigorously.html and http://www.slate.com/articles/double_x/doublex/2013/09/common_core_either_you_re_against_this_new_push_for_academic_standards_and.html). Is there a good way for academics to get more actively involved in the public discourse around the initiative?

    #2024

    Cynthia Scheinberg
    Participant
    @cyns

    It seems I am hearing a lot on NPR etc, about the move to Common Core. One  issue that seem to get a lot of attention are the various testing platforms and how a state opts in or out (or pays for) these.   I think that the perceptions differ from teachers and administrators who–though cautious and all too familiar with having to adapt to the “new standard of the moment”–nevertheless seem positive about the changes, but are much more concerned about the two companies that are doing the assessment and testing work;  Smarter Balanced and PARCC.   From the ground, I hear a lot of suspicion  about these areas, and also about Pearson’s role in developing instructional materials; between the assessments and the materials, Common Core development is a multi-billion dollar industry at this point, I think.  I believe that the more that higher ed can partner with schools and districts to make that stated CC goal of “college ready” a more collaborative endeavor, and also to develop ways to be useful (when possible and desired by those schools and districts) to our local schools as they do professional development around Common Core standards might be a way to claim our  very real higher ed stakes in this initiative and not abandon the definition of “college ready”  to the corporate educational publishing world.

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