CFP: Love as Theory, Desire, Performance

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    Yomaira Figueroa
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    @yomairaf

    We welcome submissions for the 2016 ACLA proposed seminar:

    What’s Love Got To Do With It? Love as Theory, Desire, and Performance

    http://www.acla.org/seminar/what%E2%80%99s-love-got-do-it-theory-desire-and-performance

    ACLA 2016

    Organizer: Yomaira Figueroa, Michigan State University

    Co-Organizer: Carolyn Ureña, Rutgers University

    What does love make us do? How is love understood outside of hegemonic contexts? For decades, cultural critics, literary theorists, and philosophers have turned to love in order to think through the ethical dimensions of human interrelation. During this time, a diverse group of scholars, including Luce Irigaray, bell hooks, Roland Barthes, Frantz Fanon, Martha Nussbaum, and Nelson Maldonado-Torres, have proposed new ways of thinking about this emotion. InMethodology of the Oppressed (2000) feminist decolonial theorist Chela Sandoval argues that a shared hermeneutics of love can serve as a tool for social and political transformation. Thinking beyond Western narratives of falling in and out of love, she reinvents love as a “political technology…a body of knowledges, arts, practices, and procedures for re-forming the self and the world.”

    Inspired by the ethical, social, and political power of love this seminar will engage a transdisciplinary dialogue that explores love as a multifaceted concept whose construction and recognition varies according to the social movements and cultural paradigms it represents. Drawing from such areas as literary studies, affect theory, performance studies, ethnic studies, philosophy, and social activism, this seminar asks:  What does love do and what are the consequences? Who defines love and how? What follows when we ascertain “Love” as an always recognizable and unifying emotion and precondition to activism? How do our definitions of love change when we think in terms of interracial relationships, mixed race children, and the assertion of third identitarian spaces that clash with traditional multicultural labels?

    Possible topics related to love as theory, desire, or performance include, but are not limited to:

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    <li class=”li4″>race and love

    <ul class=”ul1″>
    <ul class=”ul2″>
    <li class=”li4″>love as intimate, public and/or politic

    <ul class=”ul1″>
    <ul class=”ul2″>
    <li class=”li4″>the limits and possibilities of love as performance, social movement

    <ul class=”ul1″>
    <ul class=”ul2″>
    <li class=”li4″>decolonial and postcolonial love

    <ul class=”ul1″>
    <ul class=”ul2″>
    <li class=”li4″>love and critical mixed race studies

    <ul class=”ul1″>
    <ul class=”ul2″>
    <li class=”li4″>love and its opposite(s)

    <ul class=”ul1″>
    <ul class=”ul2″>
    <li class=”li4″>love as or against violence and war

    <ul class=”ul1″>
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    <li class=”li4″>queer, trans, non-binary love

    <ul class=”ul1″>
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    <li class=”li4″>love in the anthropocence

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    <li class=”li4″>love and (Afro)futurities

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    <li class=”li4″>transnational adoption and/or familial love

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    <li class=”li4″>love in diasporic or exilic contexts

    Please submit an abstract (~250 words) and a brief bio (~150 words) to the seminar organizers. 

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