CFPs for MLA 2023 San Francisco: 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-Century Italian

2 replies, 1 voice Last updated by Jonathan Hiller 11 months ago
Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1029606

    Jonathan Hiller
    Participant
    @jhiller

    Dear Colleagues,

    The LLC 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-Century Italian Forum is pleased to invite submissions for two guaranteed panels and one non-guaranteed roundtable for the 2023 MLA Conference (San Francisco, CA, January 5-8).

    The deadline to send your abstracts to the panel organizers is March 15, 2022.

    “Interpretation and Expression Under Duress in the Italian 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries” (guaranteed session)
    This panel invites papers that explore how writers used their art as a site of resistance, activism, and advocacy under conditions of domestic and European strife, disease outbreaks, political conflict, economic upheaval, and institutional threats. Since many of these conditions might sound unfortunately familiar for authors and scholars today, the panel is also open to interventions that highlight how the study of this period in Italian culture can offer models for sustaining intellectual work under such conditions. Please send 250-word abstracts and a brief bio by March 15, 2022 to Crystal Hall, chall@bowdoin.edu. 

    “Intersectional Work in the Italian 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries”(guaranteed session)This panel invites papers examining how intersectional identities impact and frame representations of work, historical practices of labor, and the interplay of the two between the 17th and 19th centuries in Italy. We welcome considerations of dynamics such as (but not limited to): race, citizenship, class, gender, sexuality, religion, regional identity, and language in the construction of practices and images of (Italian) labor. Who works, what does labor mean, and how was (and is) it conceived? Please send 250-word abstracts and a brief bio by March 15, 2022 to Jonathan Hiller, jhiller@adelphi.edu.

    “Homework Conditions: Uses of Translation in the Italian Language and Culture Classes” (non-guaranteed roundtable)
    For years, many teachers of Italian have limited or entirely abandoned translation practice in the Italian language and culture classroom and favored an immersive approach.  But more recently, a return to translation as a pedagogical tool has been bolstered by institutions that want to underscore the practical applications of second-language acquisition and meet the demand for translators in the workforce. At the same time, readily accessible translation apps seem to discourage investing the effort necessary to become a competent translator. This roundtable will explore how translation is being used in Italian language and culture classrooms today.

    We welcome 5-10 minute theoretical and practical interventions in which you describe the ways in which you are using translation in your classroom.  The following questions might be relevant in framing your proposal.

    • How might translation be used to help bi- or multilingual speakers learn Italian?
    • How might we use translation apps to enhance and inspire, rather than impede, the acquisition of Italian?
    • How can our programs adapt to institutional pressures to foreground translation as the primary, practical motive for learning a language?
    • What sort of experiential learning and durable translation assignments can we devise?
    • How might translations unite classrooms and communities?

    Please send 250-word abstracts and a brief bio by March 15, 2022 to Suzanne Magnanini, suzanne.magnanini@colorado.edu

    Jonathan Hiller
    Pronouns: he/lui
    Associate Professor of Italian
    Director, International Studies Program
    Adelphi University
    107 Alumnae Hall
    1 South Avenue
    Garden City, NY 11530

    #1029788

    Jonathan Hiller
    Participant
    @jhiller

    Good morning all,

    Just a reminder to please submit your proposals by the March 15 deadline for our panels.

    Regards,

    Jonathan Hiller

    #1029943

    Jonathan Hiller
    Participant
    @jhiller

    Dear Colleagues,
    The LLC 17th, 18th, and 19th-Century Italian Forum Executive Committee wishes to communicate an extension to the submission deadline of two of its sessions: the panel “Intersectional Work in the Italian 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries” and the roundtable “Homework Conditions: Uses of Translation in the Italian Language and Culture Classes”. The deadline for these two sessions is now March 22, 2022.
    Regards,

    Jonathan Hiller

     

    “Intersectional Work in the Italian 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries”(guaranteed session)

    This panel invites papers examining how intersectional identities impact and frame representations of work, historical practices of labor, and the interplay of the two between the 17th and 19th centuries in Italy. We welcome considerations of dynamics such as (but not limited to): race, citizenship, class, gender, sexuality, religion, regional identity, and language in the construction of practices and images of (Italian) labor. Who works, what does labor mean, and how was (and is) it conceived? Please send 250-word abstracts and a brief bio by March 15, 2022 to Jonathan Hiller, jhiller@adelphi.edu.

    “Homework Conditions: Uses of Translation in the Italian Language and Culture Classes” (non-guaranteed roundtable)

    For years, many teachers of Italian have limited or entirely abandoned translation practice in the Italian language and culture classroom and favored an immersive approach.  But more recently, a return to translation as a pedagogical tool has been bolstered by institutions that want to underscore the practical applications of second-language acquisition and meet the demand for translators in the workforce. At the same time, readily accessible translation apps seem to discourage investing the effort necessary to become a competent translator. This roundtable will explore how translation is being used in Italian language and culture classrooms today.

    We welcome 5-10 minute theoretical and practical interventions in which you describe the ways in which you are using translation in your classroom.  The following questions might be relevant in framing your proposal.

    • How might translation be used to help bi- or multilingual speakers learn Italian?
    • How might we use translation apps to enhance and inspire, rather than impede, the acquisition of Italian?
    • How can our programs adapt to institutional pressures to foreground translation as the primary, practical motive for learning a language?
    • What sort of experiential learning and durable translation assignments can we devise?
    • How might translations unite classrooms and communities?

    Please send 250-word abstracts and a brief bio by March 15, 2022 to Suzanne Magnanini, suzanne.magnanini@colorado.edu

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • Only members can participate in this group's discussions.