Reminder – CFP 2024 MLA Philadelphia

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    Carmela Mattza
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    @carmelamattza

    MLA 2024 – Philadelphia

    LLC 16th- and 17th-Century Spanish and Iberian Drama announces the following CFP:

    Session 1: Translating and Staging Spanish Early Modern Plays Throughout Time
    Submissions on staging early modern Spanish plays in languages other than Spanish exploring the interplay of language, translation, and emotions. 250–300-word abstracts and 1-page CV due March 6th, 2023 to Esther Fernández at: esther.fernandez@rice.edu

    Session 2: Hagiography and the Supernatural in the Comedia
    Submissions on comedias de santos and other plays featuring the otherworldly to explore the representation of holiness and the supernatural. 250–300-word abstracts and 1-page CV due March 6th, 2023 to Esther Fernández at: esther.fernandez@rice.edu

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    Session 1: Translating and Staging Spanish Early Modern Plays Throughout Time

    This roundtable welcomes submissions on staging early modern Spanish plays in languages other than Spanish (Catalan, Nahuatl, Italian, French, Portuguese, etc.) to explore how translation is impacted by cultural, political, and social settings. The presentations could discuss the translatability of the languages of the emotions, but also the adaptation of costumes, and stages. 250–300-word abstracts and 1-page CV due March 6th, 2023 to Esther Fernández at: esther.fernandez@rice.edu

    Session 2: Hagiography and the Supernatural in the Comedia

    This session welcomes submissions on comedias de santos and other plays featuring the otherworldly to explore the role played by material culture in the representation of holiness and the supernatural in early modern Iberian theater. Presentations could discuss, elements such as the “espacio de las apariencias” revealed behind the stage; the use of tramoyas to elevate figures to the heavens or bring them down to earth; the way angels, ghosts and devils appear onstage; and other ways in which holiness and the supernatural relate to the stage’s materiality. Does the artificiality of these devices call attention to their own function, thus lessening the otherworldly connection? Alternatively, would some of these elements increase the spectators’ sense of devotion or awe? Could this notion of the marvelous arise or be incremented by the way actors describe their own reactions to the matter onstage? 250-300 word abstracts and 1-page CV due March 6th, 2023 to Esther Fernández at: esther.fernandez@rice.edu

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