• A Phenomenon Occurs through Charles Dickens’s Characters in Bleak House

    Author(s):
    Lillian Melendez (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    TM Literary Criticism
    Subject(s):
    Literature
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6ZP5M
    Abstract:
    Bleak House by Charles Dickens is based in the Victorian era and the author writes this book with his own experimentation of phenomenology, even though Edmund Husserl set the blueprint on the philosophy of phenomenology. According to Robert Paradowski, “Every mental act must have a content, according to Husserl, because one cannot be aware without being aware of something; Husserl asserted that all acts of consciousness are intentional, that is, that they all have an object. Husserl’s study of intentionality led him to the crucial belief that reality was neither material nor mental, but experiential. This meant that phenomenology was more a method of philosophizing than an actual philosophy” (Robert Paradowski). Each passage in Bleak House represents the notion of a phenomenon through the characters’ urge to release suppressive thoughts in order to be faithfully in-tune to what exist and does not physically change. They are consciously exploring the existence of things with their minds while being physically in-active. Dickens opposes the Cartesian, Hobbesian, and Lockean philosophy by challenging their limited viewpoint through his characters, and these fictional beings becomes the examples of opposing the rejection against the mind being in public use.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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