• Challenging the myth of "a land without a people": Mahmoud Darwishs Journal of an Ordinary Grief and In the Presence of Absence

    Author(s):
    Hania A.M. Nashef (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    GS Nonfiction Prose, LLC Arabic, TC Memory Studies, TC Postcolonial Studies, TM Literary Criticism
    Subject(s):
    Literature, Middle Eastern history, Middle Eastern literature, Modern literature, World literature
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Absence Presence, contemporary literature, dehumanization, Edward Said, Mahmoud Darwish
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6HK6X
    Abstract:
    In his address at the Madrid Peace Conference, the Head of the Palestinian Delegation, Dr Haidar Abdul-Shafi challenged the persistent myth that has defined Palestinian existence for at least a century by saying: “For too long the Palestinian people have gone unheeded, silenced […] we have been victimized by the myth of ‘a land without a people’” (Abd Al-Shafi, 1992: 133). Negation coupled with the trauma of the loss of territory has augmented the Palestinian silence. In this article, I look at Mahmoud Darwish’s Journal of an Ordinary Grief (2010) and In the Presence of Absence (2011), drawing on Edward W. Said’s After the Last Sky (1999), in which the authors recount the untold story of their marginalized people to give voice to the silenced through accounts of a lived and observed experience.
    Notes:
    Keywords absence, exile, Mahmoud Darwish, Nakba, Palestine, resistance, Edward Said, silencing
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

    Downloads

    Item Name: docx abstract-said-darwish-jcl.docx
      Download
    Activity: Downloads: 10