• Temperament and the Senses: The Taste, Odor and Color of Drugs in Late-Renaissance Galenism

    Author(s):
    Elisabeth Moreau (see profile)
    Date:
    2023
    Group(s):
    Medical Humanities, Renaissance / Early Modern Studies, Renaissance Science and Medicine, Science Studies and the History of Science
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/098h-cc15
    Abstract:
    According to the medical tradition, the temperament of bodies came from the balance of their primary qualities – hot, cold, dry, and moist. However, physicians associated additional sensory properties with temperament in the field of pharmacology. These sensations included taste, color, and odor, which allow an appraisal of the constitution and active powers of drugs. The present paper examines this theme in late-Renaissance medicine, through the accounts of the French physician Jean Fernel (ca. 1497–1558) and the Italian physician Andrea Cesalpino (1519–1603). As will be shown, their respective interpretations of drug “faculties” offered original views on the relationship between temperament, sensory properties, and matter theories. Such discussions, in turn, revealed the Renaissance reception of Arabic-Latin pharmacology, Galenic medicine, and the Aristotelian physics of matter and form.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives

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