• Israel’s Asylum Regime: The Inconsistencies with National and International Duties

    Author(s):
    Mutasim Ali
    Date:
    2023
    Group(s):
    Michigan State International Law Review
    Subject(s):
    Law, Refugees
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/tj06-1w39
    Abstract:
    Since 2005, Israel has been a destination for refugees fleeing conflicts, repression, and political instability in some African countries, primarily Sudan, Eritrea, and western African countries. Until 2010, more than 26,000 refugees and asylum seekers entered Israel without authorization through the notorious Israeli-Egyptian borders.1 Due to the ‘illegal’ entry (not through an official border crossing point), Israeli law defines those who successfully make it to Israel as ‘infiltrators.’ The term infiltrator originates from the 1950s Anti-infiltration Law. As will be discussed later in the article, the Israeli legislator drafted the law to respond to the illegal border crossing of Palestinian Fedayeen in the 1950s. For more than a decade and a half, African asylum seekers remained in limbo with no hope of enjoying their rights to durable status, the right to family reunification, and the like. Despite Israel moving toward granting humanitarian status to genocide survivors from Sudan in recent years, significant numbers of asylum seekers, primarily from Eritrea, remain in an uncertain status.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    7 months ago
    License:
    Attribution

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