• Ficino in Aberdeen: The Continuing Problem of the Scottish Renaissance

    Author(s):
    Peter Davidson, Jane Stevenson
    Date:
    2009
    Subject(s):
    Scottish literature, Scotland, Scotland--Aberdeen, Renaissance, Humanism, Scots, Latin literature, Latin poetry, Medieval and modern, Aberdeen breviary
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Giovanni Ferrereo, Neo-Latin literature, neo-latin poetry
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/tnf6-1d64
    Abstract:
    [opening paragraph:] It is a complicating factor in the discussion of the renaissance if the historiography of a particular kingdom denies persistently that it ever existed there at all. When we began work on this article, Professor Chris Gane, a senior colleague at the University of Aberdeen, reminded us that the standard school histories of Scotland in use in the 1960s and 1970s simply stated as acknowledged fact that Scotland did not have a renaissance. The sources of this denial are not particularly difficult to diagnose: the domination of Scottish history by lowland Presbyterian agendas lasted a surprisingly long time. Another complication is the attempt to backdate the existence of a single people called ‘Scots’ where any early-modern Scot would have recognised a tripartite division into Scoti (the modern lowlands and borders) Scoti Boreali (the territories of Aberdeenshire and Moray under Gordon dominion) and Scoti Montani (the Gaelic-speaking territories, much more extensive than now). [1] These territories, of course, were under differing degrees of Royal control, and constituted distinct culture-provinces amenable in different ways to outside influence.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Online publication    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives

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