• A queer ecological reading of ecocultural identity in contemporary Mexico

    Author(s):
    Gabriela Méndez Cota (see profile)
    Date:
    2020
    Group(s):
    Environmental Humanities, Feminist Humanities, Gender Studies
    Subject(s):
    Rural women--Social life and customs, Ethnobotany, Modernity and society, Mexico, Social change, Queer theory
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    quelites, weeds, ecocultural identity, ecocultural identity
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/rmxc-5y98
    Abstract:
    This chapter analyzes activist narratives that foreground agroecological systems such as milpa farming. Here, corn has been most visibly used as a unifying metaphor for Mexican identity, while quelites (‘tender edible weeds’), which grow spontaneously at the feet of corn plants, have historically commanded much less attention. Recently, however, quelites have emerged, alongside rural women, as ecocultural agents calling for more just and sustainable futures for the Mexican nation.
    Notes:
    This chapter analyzes activist narratives that foreground agroecological systems such as milpa farming. Here, corn has been most visibly used as a unifying metaphor for Mexican identity, while quelites (‘tender edible weeds’), which grow spontaneously at the feet of corn plants, have historically commanded much less attention. Recently, however, quelites have emerged, alongside rural women, as ecocultural agents calling for more just and sustainable futures for the Mexican nation.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    5 months ago
    License:
    Attribution
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