• El libro de Job y su recepción en el cristianismo medieval. Perspectivas y reflexiones sobre el sufrimiento humano y el mal

    Author(s):
    Ignacio Cabello Llano (see profile)
    Date:
    2019
    Group(s):
    Late Medieval History, Medieval Studies
    Subject(s):
    Bible. Job, Christianity, Theology, Middle Ages, Thomas, Aquinas, Saint, 1225?-1274
    Item Type:
    Thesis
    Institution:
    Universidad Complutense de Madrid
    Tag(s):
    Albert the Great, Bible reception history, Gregory the Great, Nycolas of Lyra, Problem of Evil, suffering, Book of Job, Medieval theology, Thomas Aquinas
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/k8ez-ss20
    Abstract:
    In this work, we study the medieval Christian reception of the book of Job as a possible starting point for further reflections on the consideration and experience of suffering within the medieval religious worldview. After a presentation of the book of Job as a paradigmatic Judeo-Christian expression of the problem of human suffering —a universal issue that concerns not only philosophers and theologians but every human being—, we summarize the argument of the book, we expose the main difficulties encountered by the modern critic in reading it and, in order to find the origins of the proverbial patience of Job, which does not correspond to the image of the complaining Job of the biblical book, we describe the first steps of its reception in Antiquity. On this basis, we study the three main lines or directions taken by the book of Job in medieval Latin Christianity: the symbolic exegesis of Gregory the Great ("Moralia in Iob"), which consecrated the patristic interpretation of Job as a model of patience and moral example for the Christian in all facets of life and which exerted a remarkable influence throughout the whole period; the use of certain passages —the most dramatic and least patient— from the book of Job in the Office of the Dead —the official prayer of the Church at the moment of death— and, finally, the commentaries of Thomas Aquinas, Albert the Great and Nicholas of Lira, who, away from the excesses of symbolic-spiritual exegesis, used the book of Job to debate and argue about divine providence and the existence of evil.
    Notes:
    https://eprints.ucm.es/57572/
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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