• Savage intimacy, deviant safety: surveillance technology and club culture

    Author(s):
    Larisa Mann (see profile)
    Date:
    2017
    Group(s):
    Ethnomusicology, Law, Technology and Society, Music and Sound
    Subject(s):
    Popular music, Privacy, Spying, Area studies
    Item Type:
    Conference paper
    Conf. Title:
    IAMCR 2017 “Transforming Culture, Politics & Communication: New media, new territories, new discourses”
    Conf. Org.:
    International Association of Media And Communication Researchers
    Conf. Loc.:
    Cartagena, Colombia
    Conf. Date:
    16-20 July, 2017
    Tag(s):
    Popular Music Studies, Surveillance studies
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/2fhf-bk28
    Abstract:
    Dance music is a medium and social practice that has in some cases functioned as a site of refuge for people and communities whom mainstream society marks "deviant" or "uncivilized. Foundational movements in dance music emerge from particular spaces and times where communities are able to center bodies and practices that subvert or contradict hegemonic notions of desirability, and respectability. Poor, Black, LGBTQ and immigrant communities (in various combinations) have been at the heart of dance music from DJ culture’s origin in Jamaica to its various iterations of music from Chicago house, Detroit techno, Baltimore club music, vogue/ball culture, Dominican dembow and New Orleans bounce musics. The spaces and communities at the heart of dance music are not only the poor regions of wealthy nations, but also nodes in diasporic circulation of poor people and their music from former colonies/subjects of wealthy nations. These musical genres (and the people that make them) are best fostered in spaces of intimacy, where the community sets the terms of access and participation. When they do cross over into mainstream media circulation, they are often accompanied by moral panics that stigmatize both the bodies and the spaces that help generate them, and that lead to increased surveillance and discipline enacted on the people who generate these musical movements. In recent years, these moral panics have generated especially heightened investment in surveillance of people and places.
    Notes:
    Work on this is ongoing
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    Attribution
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