• Wasting Time on the Internet

    Author(s):
    Kenneth Goldsmith
    Editor(s):
    Michael Roy
    Date:
    2020
    Subject(s):
    Identity (Psychology)
    Item Type:
    Course Material or learning objects
    Tag(s):
    DPiH, DPiH Open, DPih Course Material or learning objects, Syllabus, Practice, Assignment, Student agency, Reflection, Digital pedagogy, Identity
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/c7vf-kj07
    Abstract:
    Curatorial note from Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: The course Wasting Time on the Internet starts with this basic premise: How do you make art out of the enormity of the Web, the Internet, and everything in between? What happens if you start with the premise that there will be no textbook, nothing you need to buy at the bookstore, nothing the library needs to license on your behalf, and you simply set students loose to do what they will, and make what they can? Wasting Time on the Internet depends upon an open Internet for the students to ramble through. As such, it is a fascinating case study, as Katy Waldman notes in “Frontiers of the Stuplime,” in not just meeting students where they are but pushing them to move beyond multitasking into a mode of pure distraction and play, all the while encouraging a level of self-awareness and reflection on what it means to create art in an age of information excess, and how the Internet shapes knowledges and identity.
    Notes:
    This deposit is part of Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities. Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities is a peer-reviewed, open-access publication edited by Rebecca Frost Davis, Matthew K. Gold, Katherine D. Harris, and Jentery Sayers, and published by the Modern Language Association. https://digitalpedagogy.hcommons.org/.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial
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