• "The Unessay"

    Author(s):
    Ryan Cordell
    Editor(s):
    Shawn Graham
    Date:
    2020
    Subject(s):
    Design, English language
    Item Type:
    Course Material or learning objects
    Tag(s):
    DPiH, DPiH History, DPih Course Material or learning objects, Student work, Forking, Digital pedagogy, Composition, English
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/rgx3-0549
    Abstract:
    Curatorial note from Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: How do we assess artifacts in history that don’t look like essays? One answer is to frame them as “unessays,” where the student chooses their own platform, their own expressive medium, to examine a question. Particularly for digital work, the unessay shifts the focus from technical competency to how the medium and the argument intersect, reinforce, or contradict each other. Daniel Paul O’Donnell coined the ideas and rationale behind the unessay; in this artifact, Ryan Cordell operationalizes the concept and provides examples of student work, from an imaginative “manifesto” by “Ada Lovelace” to highly annotated code to Tumblr photo-essays.
    Notes:
    This deposit is part of Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities. Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities is a peer-reviewed, open-access publication edited by Rebecca Frost Davis, Matthew K. Gold, Katherine D. Harris, and Jentery Sayers, and published by the Modern Language Association. https://digitalpedagogy.hcommons.org/.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    Attribution
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