• Mōt in the Phoenician History of Philo of Byblos as a Reference to the Late Representation of the Egyptian Goddess Mut as Demiurge

    Author(s):
    Olivier Dufault (see profile)
    Date:
    2019
    Group(s):
    Religious Studies
    Subject(s):
    Greco-Roman religion, Ptolemaic Egypt, Roman Egypt, Ancient Near East
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    Egyptian religions, Greco-Roman religions, Orphism
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/57vj-9q36
    Abstract:
    The article discusses the presence of a generative principle called Mōt in a short cosmogony found in the Phoenician History of Philo of Byblos (c. 100 CE). The Phoenician History's Mōt has been usually understood as the euhemeristic interpretation of a Semitic god of death, which is well documented in late Bronze Age documents from Ugarit. I argue that the name of Mōt was rather inspired by the Egyptian deity Mut as she was conceived from the Ptolemaic period on.
    Notes:
    Other keywords: Philo of Byblos Eusebius of Caesarea Ancient Egyptian Religion Comparative Religion Egyptology Greek Literature Roman History Roman Religion Ancient Greek Religion Phoenician Punic Archaeology Ancient Egyptian Cosmology Cosmogony Orphism Phoenician and Punic Studies
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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