• Modernity, “Radical Orthodoxy”, and Cornelius Van Til: A journey of rediscovery of participatory theism

    Author(s):
    Albert Roland Haig (see profile)
    Date:
    2015
    Subject(s):
    Civilization, Modern, Language and languages--Philosophy, Plato, Postmodernism, Reformed Church, Theology, Theology, Doctrinal
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Cornelius Van Til, Neoplatonism, Radical Orthodoxy, Modernity, Philosophy of language, Reformed theology, Systematic theology
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/0yd7-sa91
    Abstract:
    In this paper, the influence of modern thought on Evangelical Protestant theology is analysed. It is argued that a critical engagement with the theology of Cornelius Van Til represents an ideal starting point for this analysis. Van Til's claim that all human knowledge must be analogical is defended. It is argued that rationalism is a specifically modern phenomenon, and that its root cause was the severance of the ontological bond between the Creator and His creation that occurred in the late medieval period. Rationalism is seen as inevitably ending in nihilism. Van Til is subject to criticism on the grounds that his metaphysics is inconsistent with his epistemology, and that he adopts the modern ontological Creator/creation split. In sympathy with the contemporary theological movement known as “radical orthodoxy”, it is argued here that a truly Christian theology must embrace the Platonic doctrine of participation. It is suggested that a revisitation of the Renaissance idea of a prisca theologia, thoroughly reformulated in the light of modern historical criticism, might be helpful to this end.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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