• Accounting for the great divide: Features of clarity in analytic philosophy journal articles

    Author(s):
    Valerie Hobbs (see profile)
    Date:
    2014
    Subject(s):
    Corpus linguistics, Linguistics, Philosophy, Teaching English language
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    disciplinary discourse, English for Academic Purposes
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6XK84Q3X
    Abstract:
    While some limited studies exist examining philosophy texts (Bloor, 1996; Hyland, 2005), these focus exclusively on the analytic tradition. This study makes explicit the ‘great divide’ between analytic and continental philosophy by examining how the importance of clarity in analytic philosophy, largely connected to its alignment with scientific inquiry, influences use of certain linguistic features and distinguishes analytic from continental journal articles. Using a one-million word corpus along with input from disciplinary experts, findings include analytic philosophy’s tendency to limit lexical richness and use shorter sentences, self-mention, and imperative directives to a much greater extent than continental philosophy. This study has implications for further research on philosophy texts, students entering the discipline, and those who enable them to become members of this community.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    7 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
    Share this:

    Downloads

    Item Name: doc jeap-manuscript_revised.doc
      Download
    Activity: Downloads: 51