• Julius Caesar: Tyrannicide Made Unpopular

    Author(s):
    Murat Öğütcü (see profile)
    Date:
    2017
    Group(s):
    CLCS Renaissance and Early Modern, GS Drama and Performance, LLC Shakespeare
    Subject(s):
    Shakespeare and early modern drama, Early modern English culture, Early modern political thought, Shakespeare
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    julius caesar, tyranny, Earl of Essex
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6H56S
    Abstract:
    The late Elizabethan Period was marked by socio-economic discontent. Amid this, Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar (1599) featured a prominent debate: whether or not tyrannicide could solve problems. Around 1599, Essex formulated a like-minded political revolution only to dismiss it until 1601. Yet, as providentialist and republican debates failed to provide solutions against misgovernment, the 1601 Essex rebellion also proved abortive. Essex was considered another regicide Brutus rather than a saviour. Contrary to the majority of apolitical or ahistorical critical analyses about tyranny in the play, a historicized analysis of Julius Caesar, therefore, illustrates how tyrannicide might have been perceived by Elizabethan playgoers.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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