• Poetic Language and Corporeality in Translations of Greek Tragedy

    Author(s):
    Stephe Harrop (see profile) , David Wiles
    Date:
    2008
    Group(s):
    Ancient Greece & Rome, Classical Tradition
    Subject(s):
    Choreography, Classical reception, Dance, Greek and Roman drama, Translation
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6TG0D
    Abstract:
    The translation of ancient tragedy is often considered at a linguistic level, as if the drama consisted simply of words being written, spoken and heard. This article contends that translation for the stage is a process in which literary decisions have physical, as well as verbal, outcomes. It traces existing formulations concerning the links between vocal and bodily expression, and explores the ways in which printed texts might be capable of suggesting modes of corporeality or systems of movement to the embodied performer. It sketches some of the ways in which the range of possible relationships between language and physicality might be explored and understood, drawing upon recent practice-based research into the work of three modern poetic translators of Greek tragedy.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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