• Public Execution and Justice on/off the Elizabethan Stage: Shakespeare s First Tetralogy

    Author(s):
    Murat Öğütcü (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Subject(s):
    Jurisprudence, Shakespeare
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6F64R
    Abstract:
    Abstract: The Elizabethan regime in its last fifteen years faced many socio-political tensions. Although disorganised at first, as time passed, tensions increased and attempts were made to voice aloud socio- political criticisms, but use of the repressive state apparatus of the judicial system suppressed these. Accordingly, public execution was employed to exert the executive powers of the monarch against dissent. Deserved punishment in the theatre’s public executions could create a cathartic effect, reducing tensions about injustice that was felt by the Elizabethan playgoers in real life. Yet, the arbitrariness of justice in the executions on and off the stage complicated the creation of such a catharsis, as displayed, especially, in Shakespeare’s first tetralogy (ca. 1589-1594). Accordingly, this article analyses the politics and poetics of public execution and it suggests that scenes of executions in theatres increased the socio- political tensions caused by the injustice of the Late Elizabethan Period. Keywords: Shakespeare, History Plays, First Tetralogy, Public Execution, Politics, Poetics
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal Article
    Pub. DOI:
    DOI: 10.13114/MJH.2016.304
    Journal:
    Mediterranean Journal of Humanities
    Volume:
    6
    Start Page:
    361
    End Page:
    361
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 months ago
    License:
    Attribution

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