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MemberAlicia Meyer

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Ph.D., Candidate, Department of English, with Certificate in Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, and Certificate in Global Medieval and Renaissance Studies, University of Pennsylvania anticipated 2021.
 
M.A., Department of English, Certificate in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, University of Nebraska 2015.

B.A., magna cum laude, Honors, Departments of English, History, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, University of Nebraska 2013

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Alicia Meyer is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English with a certificate in Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies.

MemberMegan Brown

Megan Brown is Professor of English at Drake University and the author of two books: American Autobiography After 9/11 (University of Wisconsin Press, 2017) and The Cultural Work of Corporations (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009). Her work has also appeared in BiographyAssayWomen’s Studies QuarterlyCollege Literature,South Atlantic Quarterly, and Cultural Studies. She teaches courses in memoir and autobiography, personal essay, and American literature.

MemberDara Goldman

…B.A. in Latin American Studies, Columbia University, 1992

M.A. in Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Columbia University, 1994

Ph.D. in Spanish, Emory University, 2000

Certificate in Women’s Studies, Emory University, 2000…

Dara E. Goldman is an Associate Professor of Spanish, specializing in contemporary Caribbean and Latin American literatures and cultures, gender and sexualities studies and cultural studies. She is the author of Out of Bounds: Islands and the Demarcation of Identity in the Hispanic Caribbean (Bucknell Univ. Press, 2008) and has also published numerous articles on how Caribbean identities are represented in contemporary literature and film. Professor Goldman has served as Director of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies/Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies and also holds appointments as Affiliate Faculty in several camps units, including the Program in Comparative and World Literatures, Center for Global Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, the Program in Jewish Culture and Society, Latina/Latino Studies, the Unit for Criticism and Interpretative Theory, and Women & Gender in a Global Perspective.

MemberMargaret Galvan

Margaret Galvan is Assistant Professor of visual rhetoric in the Department of English at the University of Florida. She is currently at work on a book, In Visible Archives of the 1980s: Feminist Politics and Queer Platforms, under contract with the Manifold Scholarship series of the University of Minnesota Press, which traces a genealogy of queer theory in 1980s feminism through representations of sexuality in visual culture. Her published work, which analyzes visual media culture through intersectional archival approaches, can be found in journals like WSQ: Women’s Studies Quarterly, Archive Journal, and Australian Feminist Studies and in collections like The Ages of The X-Men (2014) and Disability in Comic Books and Graphic Narratives (2016).

MemberMarci McMahon

Marci R. McMahon is Associate Professor in the Literatures and Cultural Studies Department at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV), with affiliations in the Gender and Women’s Studies program and Mexican American Studies program. She previously served as the Interim Director of the Mexican American Studies Program and Center at the University of Texas Pan American (UTPA) and University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV), a bicultural and biliterate university along the US-Mexico border in South Texas and one of the largest Hispanic Serving Institutions in the nation. Her publications appear inThe Chicano Studies Reader: An Anthology of Aztlán, 3rdEdition; Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano StudiesChicana/Latina Studies: The Journal of MALCSFrontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies;Journal of Equity & Excellence in Education; and Text & Performance Quarterly.She is the author of Domestic Negotiations: Gender, Nation, and Self-Fashioning in US Mexicana and Chicana Literature and Art(Rutgers University Press, 2013), the first interdisciplinary study to explore how US Mexicana and Chicana authors and artists across different historical periods and regions use domestic space to engage with recurring debates about race, gender, and immigration. Her second book Sounding Cultural Citizenship: Latinx Dramaturgy in Times of Crises extends this focus on performance, gender, and immigration, to explore critical moments in US history when citizenship has been redefined by Latinx communities and has been in crisis; the book argues that citizenship is performed through sound, with aurality and listening as vital to performances of citizenship.

MemberSimone Chess

Simone Chess is Associate Chair and Associate Professor of English at Wayne State University and an affiliate of the Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies Program. Her book, Male-to-Female Crossdressing in Early Modern English Literature: Gender, Performance, and Queer Relations (Routledge, 2016) argues that representations of male-to-female crossdressers in literature show models of queer male femininities that are relational and beneficial. In addition to the book, she has published articles and book chapters on the topics of crossdressing and gender labor, bathroom activism, ballads and Shakespeare, early modern representations of blindness, the role of oath-making in “murderous wife” ballads, and other aspects of early modern gendered representation. Her next book project will bring together early modern queer and disability studies.

MemberVenetria Patton

Dr. Venetria K. Patton is Head of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies, Professor of English and African American Studies . From 2003-2015, she served as Director of African American Studies and Research Center at Purdue. She earned her B.A. in English from the University of La Verne and her M.A. and Ph.D. in English from the University of California-Riverside. Dr. Patton’s teaching and research focus on African American and Diasporic Women’s Literature. In 2003, she won two teaching awards: the Annis Chaiken Sorensen Distinguished Teaching Award in the Arts and Humanities and the College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Dr. Patton is the author of The Grasp That Reaches Beyond the Grave: the Ancestral Call in Black Women’s Texts (SUNY, 2014), Women in Chains: The Legacy of Slavery in Black Women’s Fiction (SUNY, 2000), the Co-editor of Double-Take: A Revisionist Harlem Renaissance Anthology (Rutgers, 2001) and editor of Teaching American Literature: Background Readings (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2006). Her essays have appeared in Black Studies and Women’s Studies journals as well as the essay collections, Postcolonial Perspectives on Women Writers From Africa, the Caribbean, and the US (Africa World Press, 2003), White Scholars/African American Texts (Rutgers UP, 2005), and Imagining the Black Female Body: Reconciling Image in Print and Visual Culture (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010). She is also the editor of the fall 2011 issue of Black Women, Gender, and Families and co-editor of the spring 2004 issue of The Black Scholar. Dr. Patton is a former Chair of the Purdue Black Caucus of Faculty and Staff and is a former board member of the Hanna Community Center and the National Council for Black Studies.

MemberMichael Allan

Michael Allan is editor of Comparative Literature and associate professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Oregon. He is affiliated with Cinema Studies, Arabic, Middle East Studies, New Media and Culture, African Studies, and Comics Studies. His research focuses on debates in world literature, postcolonial studies, literary theory, as well as film and visual culture, primarily in Africa and the Middle East. In both his research and teaching, he bridges textual analysis with social theory, and draws from methods in anthropology, religion, queer theory and area studies. He is the author of In the Shadow of World Literature: Sites of Reading in Colonial Egypt (Princeton 2016, Co-Winner of the MLA Prize for a First Book), and is at work on a second book, Picturing the World: The Global Routes of Early Cinema, 1896-1903, which traces the transnational history of camera operators working for the Lumière Brothers film company. He serves on the editorial board of the Journal of World Literature, Philological Encounters, Syndicate Lit, and Middle East Topics & Arguments. He was elected a member of the executive committee for LLC Arabic (2017-2021) and a delegate of Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Comparative Literature (2019-2021) for the Modern Language Association. He was a EUME Fellow at the Forum for Transregional Studies in Berlin (2011-12, 2017-2018), a Townsend Fellow at the Townsend Center for the Humanities in Berkeley (2006-7), and a Presidential Intern at the American University in Cairo, where he worked with its Institute of Gender and Women’s Studies (2000-1). For two summers (2011-12), he was the site director for the CLS Arabic Program in Tangier, Morocco.