Search

MemberDenae Dyck

  Denae Dyck is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English at the University of Victoria. Her doctoral research has been supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Centre for Studies in Religion and Society at UVic, and the Visiting Scholars Program of the Armstrong Browning Library at Baylor University. Her dissertation examines the impact of biblical higher criticism on Victorian literature, focusing on how this criticism prompted a creative recovery of biblical wisdom literature.  

MemberAlison Booth

Prosopography: with IATH and Scholars’ Lab at UVA, I’m working on Collective Biographies of Women, an online bibliography and database. With Suzanne Keen, we’re developing an approach to nonfiction narrative, specifically biographies in “documentary social networks,” using a stand-aside XML schema, BESS. Always interested in books, Victorian literature, women writers and feminist studies, narrative theory. Looking for wisdom on space and narrative, word-image studies; in the DH context, this means things like Neatline and visualizations of all sorts. http://womensbios.lib.virginia.edu and http://cbw.iath.virginia.edu/cbw_db

MemberJodi Eichler-Levine

Jodi Eichler-Levine is an associate professor of Religion Studies and serves as the Berman Professor of Jewish Civilization at Lehigh University and Director of American Studies. Her work is located at the intersection of Jewish studies, religion in North America, literature, material culture, and gender studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Religion from Columbia University and a B.A. in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies from Brandeis University. Before coming to Lehigh, she spent eight years as a professor of Religious Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. Professor Eichler-Levine is the author of Suffer the Little Children: Uses of the Past in Jewish and African American Children’s Literature (NYU Press, 2013), which was reissued in paperback in 2015. In this work, she analyzes what is at stake in portraying religious history for young people, particularly when the histories in question are traumatic ones. Her publications have also appeared in American Quarterly, Shofar, and other journals.  Additionally, she has written for Religion DispatchesTikkunReligion in American History (where her work was also featured), and the Christian Century Then and Now blog. As an affiliate of the Berman Center for Jewish Studies and a member of the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies core faculty, Dr. Eichler-Levine’s teaching encompasses a wide range of topics, including Jewish comics and graphic novels, religion and food; religious children’s literature; modern Jews; Jews, gender and sexuality; and religion, sci-fi, and fantasy. On the national level, has previously served as co-chair of  co-chair of the Association for Jewish Studies Women’s Caucus  and of the  American Academy of Religion’s Religion, Memory, History Group. Future projects include a book length work on Jewish women, material culture, politics, and performance, currently titled Crafting Judaism: American Jewish Women and Creativity. Professor Eichler-Levine also continues to write on Jewish children’s literature and on race, ethnicity, and religion in the United States. When she is not wearing her professional hats, Professor Eichler-Levine enjoys knitting, sci-fi and fantasy series (all-time favorite: Buffy the Vampire Slayer), the Boston Red Sox, and the Green Bay Packers. She lives in the Lehigh Valley with her husband and daughter.

MemberIfeoma C. Kiddoe Nwankwo

  Ifeoma Kiddoe Nwankwo, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Vanderbilt University. Her work centers on intercultural and intergenerational relations, particularly as they surface in the literary texts, oral narratives, and popular music of Afro-descendants in the U.S., Caribbean, and Latin America. Her publications include Black Cosmopolitanism; “Bilingualism, Blackness, and Belonging,”; “Race and Representation in the Digital Humanities;” Rhythms of the Afro-Atlantic World (co-edited with Mamadou Diouf); and African Routes, Caribbean Roots, Latino Lives. She is former Director of the Program in American Studies andhas just completed her first three-year term as Associate Provost for Strategic Initiatives and Partnerships.   Dr. Nwankwo’s innovative interdisciplinary projects use community-engaged research methodologies alongside literary critical ones to analyze and advance intercultural and intergenerational relations. These projects include Voices from Our AmericaTM, an international public scholarship and digital humanities project that uses interviews, autobiography and art production, along with archival research to uncover new aspects of communities’ histories then draws on those new sources to develop digital and print publications as well as workshops and other educational programs for K-12 teachers, older adults, and youth. Dr. Nwankwo’s projects also include The Wisdom of the Elders, an initiative focused on revealing and recognizing older adults’ life- and soul- sustaining wisdoms and productively incorporating them into K-12, undergraduate, graduate and health professional education.