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MemberAndrew Keener

Drawing on book history methods, translation studies, and theater and performance studies, I research how bilingual and multilingual dictionaries, grammars, and conversation guides printed in early modern England shaped and were shaped by cosmopolitan dramatic works by William Shakespeare, Thomas Kyd, Ben Jonson, and other playwrights. I am also beginning a new project interested in the developing vocabularies of mixing, combination, and diversity as they manifest in tragicomedy and other dramatic subgenres. I also teach courses on Shakespeare, book history, critical thinking, and writing in English.

MemberJames Fitzmaurice

My present research focuses on connections between the visual arts and Margaret Cavendish’s poetry, fiction, and drama. My sense of visual arts is derived from research into painting, prints, and drawings that were available for Cavendish to see when she lived in Antwerp during the 1650s and in England in the 1660s. She thought of herself as a woman who painted in words and sometimes commented on art as it was collected for and displayed in country houses. She and her husband wrote within (and against) traditions of the representation of art and country houses found in the writings of William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson.

MemberElizabeth E. Tavares

Elizabeth E. Tavares, PhD, (she/her) is an interdisciplinary scholar of Medieval and Renaissance literature and performance. She is currently at work on her first book manuscript, The Repertory System Before Shakespeare: Playing the Stock Market, which traces the development of the repertory system and the ways in which it conditioned the 1580s and ’90s English theatre industry to argue that it was repetition, revision, and collaboration, rather than novelty, that produced the diverse, solvent marketplace in which William Shakespeare and his contemporaries would come to train. Her recent research interests include the role climatological phenomena played in the emergence of the professional playing companies, the place of victualing houses in sixteenth-century new play development, and the effects of content curation on early (modern) habits of mind. Her most recent work explores allusion and representation of Tartary tribes, unified under Chinggis Khan in the early thirteenth century, in sixteenth-century English theatrical documents and travelogues. Tavares’s scholarship and reviews have appeared in or are forthcoming from Shakespeare Studies, Shakespeare Bulletin, Notes & Queries, Shakespeare, Scene, The Journal of Dramatic Theory & Criticism, and The Map of Early Modern London, among others. She has been the recipient of numerous fellowships and grants, including from the NEH, Mellon Foundation, Early Modern Conversions, Folger Library, Huntington Library, Newberry Library, and Society for Theatre Research. This research has been recognized with prizes from the Medieval & Renaissance Drama Society and Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities. For more, visit her website, blog, or follow Tavares on Twitter (@ElizETavares).

MemberJennifer E. Nicholson

I recently submitted my PhD in the Department of English at the University of Sydney, Australia. My research projects currently span Shakespeare studies (particularly Hamlet), Montaigne, Shakespeare in translation, Renaissance books, Renaissance publication history, and world literature. I have also worked on Anglophone translations of Japanese film and my broader research interests include untranslatability and comparative translation.

MemberValerie Billing

Valerie Billing is Assistant Professor of English at Central College, where she teaches courses in Shakespeare, medieval and early modern English literature, world literature, LGBTQ+ literature, and disability literature. She holds a B.A. in English Literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Early Modern English Literature from the University of California, Davis. Valerie’s current research project investigates the erotics of size in a range of early modern drama, poetry, prose, and visual art.