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MemberDaniel Davies

After studying in Edinburgh and Berlin, I entered the University of Pennsylvania’s graduate program in English, where I am currently completing my Ph.D. My research centers on war and literature in the late Middle Ages, focusing in particular on how the sprawling series of conflicts now known as the Hundred Years War (1337-1453) changed the way war was represented, theorized, and historicized. I also have related interests in classical reception, material texts, visual culture, and the methodologies of literary study.

MemberJulie Beth Napolin

I teach modernism, sound studies, and film & media at the New School. I am a postdoctoral fellow in the Price Lab for Digital Humanities at the University of Pennsylvania, working on a project titled, “The Sound of Yoknapatawpha: An Acoustic Ecology.” I am particularly interested in the history of sound technology, its entanglements with race, and what these can tell us about the novel as form.

MemberTeresa Goddu

…Books
 
Selling Antislavery: Abolition and Mass Media in Antebellum America (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020).
 
Gothic America: Narrative, History, and Nation (New York: Columbia University Press, 1997).

Teresa A. Goddu is Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Vanderbilt University. She is a specialist in nineteenth-century American literature and culture. Her research and teaching focus on slavery and antislavery, race and American culture, the history of the book, genre studies, as well as print, material and visual culture. She is the author of Gothic America: Narrative, History, and Nation (Columbia University Press) and Selling Antislavery: Abolition and Mass Media in Antebellum America (University of Pennsylvania Press). Her recent research focuses on the environmental humanities. She is writing a book-length study of contemporary U.S. climate fiction and she curates a climate fiction collection at the Vanderbilt library. 

MemberKavita Daiya

Kavita Daiya is Associate Professor of English and Affiliated Faculty in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program and The Global Women’s Institute at George Washington University. In AY 2015-2016, she held the NEH endowed Chair in the Humanities at Albright College, focusing on Global Migration and Asia. She was Mellon Regional Faculty Fellow at the Penn Humanities Forum at the University of Pennsylvania (2014-2015). She serves as Associate Editor of the MLA-Allied Association journal “South Asian Review.” She has also been a Research Fellow at the Globalization Project at the University of Chicago.Daiya’s research and teaching expertise spans postcolonial literature and cinema, gender studies, globalization, peace and conflict studies, and ethnic American studies. Her current book focuses on ethnic migrations, citizenship, and gender in South Asia and the United States. She has written numerous articles on the 1947 Partition, South Asian literature and culture, South African Literature, gender studies, and transnational cinema, and her first book was published in the US and India: Violent Belongings: Partition, Gender and National Culture in Colonial India (Philadelphia: Temple UP, [2008] 2011; New Delhi: Yoda Press, 2013).

Daiya directs a Digital Humanities Histories of Violence and Migration initiative http://www.1947Partition.org. She has co-edited a special issue “Imagining South Asia” of the “South Asian Review,” and has been invited to present her work at the US State Department, University of Chicago, Amherst College, University of Maryland, University of Pennsylvania, Brandeis University, Georgetown University, and the University of Michigan, among others. Her research has been generously supported by fellowships from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Chicago, and George Washington University’s Global Women’s Institute and Sigur Center for Asian Studies. She serves as a member of the Board of Directors of The 1947 Partition Archive (www.1947PartitionArchive.org). In 2013, she co-founded the Philadelphia South Asian American Association.

MemberSierra Lomuto

…Ph.D. in English, University of Pennsylvania, 2018

M.A. in English and American Literature, Mills College, 2009

B.A. in English/Creative Writing and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Mills College, 2007…

I am an Assistant Professor of English at Macalester College, where I also hold a Consortium for Faculty Diversity Postdoctoral Fellowship (2018-2020).  My teaching and research interests focus on medieval histories of global contact and the literature they engendered; the formation of racial ideologies in the Middle Ages; and contemporary appropriations of the medieval past. I am currently working on my first book, Exotic Allies: Race, Literature, and the Construction of Mongols in Medieval Europe. I earned my Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.A. and B.A. from Mills College, and I’m a former community college student from the San Francisco Bay Area.

MemberChristopher Lukasik

…“Race and the Rise of A Mass Visual Culture: The Case of David Hunter Strother’s Virginia Illustrated,” American Literary History 32:3 (Fall 2020): 446-479.
 
Discerning Characters: The Culture of Appearance in Early America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011…

Christopher J. Lukasik is a Provost’s Fellow for Fulbright Faculty Awards and an Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Purdue University, specializing on the literary and visual cultural history of the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Atlantic world. He has received over fifteen fellowships, including long-term awards from the Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Fulbright Senior Scholar Program, the American Antiquarian Society, the Boston University Humanities Foundation, the Purdue Research Foundation, and the Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture at the University of Virginia. He has presented over 90 papers on three continents and his work has been published in over a dozen journals. He is the author of Discerning Characters: The Culture of Appearance in Early America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011) and he is currently working on a new book project entitled The Image in the Text: Intermediality, Illustration, and Nineteenth-Century American Literature.

MemberKenric K. Tsethlikai

As Managing Director of the Lauder Institute, I oversee a joint-degree program at the University of Pennsylvania: MBA/MA in International Studies & JD/MA in International Studies. I supervise daily operations in areas from recruiting and admissions to graduation, from business administration to external affairs, and from research to outreach programs. I began at the Lauder Institute in 2008 as the Director of Lauder’s Language and Culture Programs. Thanks to these positions, I have gained extensive experience program building and immersion education in locations around the world. I serve as the primary academic advisor and thus work closely with the Wharton Graduate Division and the Penn School of Arts & Sciences in planning and executing the Institute’s programs and activities.

MemberOrchid Tierney

…BA (Hons). University of Otago, 2001
MCW. University of Auckland, 2010
MA. University of Otago, 2013
MA. University of Pennsylvania, 2014
PhD. University of Pennsylvania, 2013-2019…

Orchid Tierney joined the English faculty at Kenyon College in 2019 after receiving her doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania. She teaches American and Anglophone poetry with a specific focus on the literatures of the Pacific region. Her scholarly interests include environmental humanities, sound studies and the digital humanities. Her current book project investigates the systems and representations of waste and waste management in contemporary poetry and film.  She is the author of a year of misreading of the wildcats (New York: The Operating System, 2019) and five chapbooks, including ocean plastic (New York: BlazeVOX, 2019), blue doors (New York: Belladonna* Press, 2018) and Gallipoli Diaries (n.p.: Gauss PDF, 2017). In addition to her creative work, her scholarship and reviews have been published in journals such as Jacket2 and the Journal of Modern Literature. She currently serves as a reviews editor for Jacket2.

MemberLucia Martinez

I work primarily in early modern English poetry and non-dramatic prose, with a focus on Reformation politics and poetics; my Master’s thesis is on Donne’s first Satyre as prosopopoeia. My dissertation is titled _Making a Solemn Note: The Music and Meter of English Reformation Psalms_.Current (and ongoing) interests include the lyric poetry of Sidney and Donne, music in Milton, family dynamics in Shakespeare, Spenser’s shorter works and letters, and the science of cognitive poetics. My spare time is occupied by my beagle, Boswell, culinary debacles, penning a DIY column for thehairpin.com, and my violin.BM, Violin Performance, Florida State University (2005); MA, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia (2007); PhD, English Literature, University of Pennsylvania (2014).

MemberNesrine Chahine

Nesrine Chahine (PhD, University of Pennsylvania) specializes in modern Arabic literature in its global relations to European and non-Western cultural histories. Her book project, Marketplaces of the Modern, examines representations of Egypt as a marketplace in texts by twentieth-century Egyptian and Anglophone authors, arguing that unresolved narrative tensions over the commodification of laboring bodies, cultural artifacts, and raw goods reflect the troubled history of metropolitan influence in twentieth-century Egypt.  The project engages debates on transnationalism and globalization by emphasizing the necessity of recuperating the material dimensions of culture.  Her translation of selections from Ahmad Shawqi’s Death of Cleopatra has appeared in the Norton Critical Edition of Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, and she is currently in negotiations with the American University of Beirut Press for the publication of a trilingual volume in an anthology series on Lotus, the journal of the Afro-Asian Writer’s Union.