Search

MemberSevinc Turkkan

Dr. Sevinç Türkkan teaches modern Turkish literature and intellectual history at the University of Rochester. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Comparative Literature Studies, Türkisch-deutsche Studien Jahrbuch, Translation and Literature, Teaching Translation (Ed. L. Venuti, Routledge), Orhan Pamuk: Critical Essays on a Novelist between Worlds (Ibidem), Global Perspectives on Orhan Pamuk (Routledge), Post-1960 Novelists in Turkey, Making Connections, International Journal of the Humanities, and elsewhere. Her translations from German appeared in Best European Fiction edited by Aleksandar Hemon (Dalkey Archive Press). Her translation of Aslı Erdoğan’s book The Stone Building and Other Places was published by City Lights Books in 2018. She is the co-editor (with David Damrosch) of Approaches to Teaching the Works of Orhan Pamuk (MLA, 2017) and she is at work on a book manuscript titled Translation Criticism and the Construction of World Literature.

MemberCaroline Edwards

20th and 21st Century Literature Science Fiction, Utopian Literature, Utopian Studies Critical Theory and the Frankfurt School Philosophy of Time Environmental Humanities, Petrocultures, Energy Humanities Open Access Publishing Dr Caroline Edwards is Senior Lecturer in Modern & Contemporary Literature in the Department of English & Humanities at Birkbeck, University of London, where she is actively involved with Birkbeck’s Centre for Contemporary Literature. Her research focuses on the utopian imagination in contemporary literature, science fiction, apocalyptic narratives, and Western Marxism. She is author of Utopia and the Contemporary British Novel (Cambridge University Press, 2019), which examines temporal experience and utopian anticipation in contemporary texts by British writers including Hari Kunzru, Maggie Gee, David Mitchell, Ali Smith, Jim Crace, Joanna Kavenna, Grace McCleen, Jon McGregor and Claire Fuller. Her work on contemporary writers has also led to two co-edited books: China Miéville: Critical Essays, co-edited with Tony Venezia (Gylphi, 2015) and Maggie Gee: Critical Essays, co-edited with Sarah Dillon (Gylphi, 2015). Caroline is currently working on her second monograph, Arcadian Revenge: Utopia, Apocalypse and Science Fiction in the Era of Ecocatastrophe, which considers how fictions of extreme environments (such as Mars, Antarctica, the deep sea, and the centre of the Earth) have allowed writers to imagine creative responses to real and perceived disasters about climate change, from the late 19th century to the present day. Caroline has written a number of journal articles for publications such as TelosModern Fiction StudiesTextual PracticeContemporary LiteratureASAP/Journal, the New Statesman and the Times Higher Education Supplement. Her book chapter contributions on science and utopian fiction and contemporary literature include chapters for The Cambridge Companion to British Fiction, 1980-2018 (ed. Peter Boxall), The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction, 2nd edition (ed. Niall Harrison, Farah Mendlesohn and Edward James), Science Fiction: A Literary History (ed. Roger Luckhurst, for the British Library Press), The Routledge Companion to Twenty-First Century Literary Fiction (ed. Daniel O’Gorman and Robert Eaglestone), British Literature in Transition, 1980–2000: Accelerated Times (ed. Eileen Pollard and Berthold Schoene, Cambridge University Press, 2019) and the Palgrave Handbook of Utopian and Dystopian Literature (ed. Jennifer Wagner-Lawlor, Fátima Vieira and Peter Marks). In addition to her public engagement work, Caroline has also been invited to lecture at a number of academic and public institutions, including Harvard University, the European Commission in Brussels, the LSE, King’s College London, the National Library of Sweden, the University of Durham, the Academy of the Fine Arts in Vienna, UCL, the University of Cardiff, the Royal Irish Academy, SOAS, the University of Warwick, the Literary London Society, the British Library, Queen Mary, University of London, and the Institute of English Studies. She has given media interviews for the BBC, the Chronicle of Higher Education, the Times Higher Education, the Austrian national broadcaster Österreichischer Rundfunk (ORF) and the Guardian. She is regularly involved in public speaking and has been invited to share her research in events at the Wellcome Trust, the Institute of Contemporary Arts, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 3, Hillingdon Literary Festival, the Museum of London, BBC One South East, the Royal Observatory at Greenwich, and the LSE Literary Festival. Caroline is known for her advocacy in open access publishing. She is Founding and Commissioning Editor of the open access journal of 21st-century literary criticism, Alluvium, and is Founder (with Prof. Martin Eve) and Editorial Director of the Open Library of Humanities (OLH) – a leading open access publishing platform for humanities journals, which is also working with numerous international partners including: Harvard University Press, Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Open Book Publishers, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Public Knowledge Project, the Wellcome Trust, the British Library, the Creative Commons, RCUK, Jisc Collections, and the Modern Languages Association. As part of her campaigning for open access and work in publishing, Caroline regularly gives invited keynote talks and lectures at open access conferences and publishing events. Caroline supervises several PhD research students working on contemporary literature and science fiction, as well as digital humanities, projects. She welcomes PhD applications on the following topics: 21st-century literature, utopian and dystopian narratives, science fiction (particularly feminist SF, ecocatastrophe narratives, the New Weird, and contemporary slipstream), apocalyptic literature and culture, literary and critical theory, Western Marxism and the philosophy of the Frankfurt School. Caroline was on grant-funded leave from teaching for 2015-2018. Between 2013 and 2015, she was Director of the MA Contemporary Literature and Culture and taught on the BA English, MA Contemporary Literature and Culture, MA Modern and Contemporary Literature and MA Cultural and Critical Studies. Caroline joined the department in September 2013, having previously worked as Lecturer in English at the University of Lincoln (2011-2013), Tutor in English Literature at the University of Surrey (2010-2011) and Visiting Lecturer at the University of Nottingham (2008). She was made a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) in 2016 and was a founding Secretary of the British Association for Contemporary Literary Studies (BACLS). Contact details: Email: caroline.edwards@bbk.ac.uk Twitter: @the_blochian Website: http://www.drcarolineedwards.com/

MemberMihai Mindra

Professor of American Literature and American Civilization; Brandeis University, Mass. Fulbright fellow (2001- 2002), J.F. Keedy Institute for North American Studies grantee (2003). Author of numerous studies on American literature; e.g. The Phenomenology of the Novel, 2002; Strategists of Assimilation: Abraham Cahan, Mary Antin, Anzia Yezierska, 2003; “Narrative Constructs and Border Transgressions in Jewish-American Holocaust Fiction”, Studies in Jewish American Literature, 28 (2009): 46-54; “La Roumanie et les Juifs. Pessimisme ou lucidité?” Cité, 29/2007, Presses Universitaire de France, 2007; “Delving into the Kernel: Teaching Bernard Malamud in Post-Communist Romania.” Imaginaires 14 Presses Universitaire de France (2010): 73-92; “Inescapable Colonization: Norman Manea’s Eternal Exile”. Literature in Exile of East and Central Europe. Ed. Agnieszka Gutthy.  N.Y.: Peter Lang, 2009. His most recent publications are: “From Shtetl to the Hub: Mary Antin’s Networking Palimpsest,” Intercontinental Cross-Currents: Women’s (Net-)Works across Europe and the Americas (1776-1939), eds. Julia Nitz, Sandra Harbert Petrulionis, and Theresa Schon,  (2016, European Views of the United States – Universitätsverlag Winter); “Space and Place in Fictional Storyworlds,” Teaching Space, Place and Literature. Ed. Robert T. Tally Jr., London: Routledge, forthcoming – 2018.

MemberKaren Grumberg

Karen Grumberg is Associate Professor in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies and the Program in Comparative Literature at the University of Texas at Austin, where she also serves as Director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. She is the author of Space and Place in Contemporary Hebrew Literature (Syracuse UP, 2011). Her second book, Hebrew Gothic: History and the Poetics of Persecution, is currently under review.

MemberKerim Yasar

I teach modern Japanese literature and film at the University of Southern California. I was previously Assistant Professor of Japanese at The Ohio State University and had visiting appointments at Boston University and the University of Notre Dame. I was the East Asian Studies-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts at Princeton University between 2009-12.