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MemberTon van Kalmthout

Ton van Kalmthout studied Dutch Language and Literature at the University of Nijmegen (now Radboud University Nijmegen) and gained his Ph.D. in 1998 at the University of Amsterdam with a thesis on multidisciplinary art clubs in the Netherlands between 1880 and 1914. He worked as a teacher of Dutch at secondary school, and taught at the teacher-training programmes for Dutch at Hogeschool Rotterdam and the University of Leiden. He also worked as a teacher and post-doctoral researcher at the Dutch Language and Culture Section of the University of Groningen. Since 2005, he is a senior researcher at Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands. His field of interest is the international distribution and reception of literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

MemberSteve Mentz

Steve Mentz is Professor of English at St. John’s University in New York City. His work explores Early Modern Literature, Ecocriticism, Shakespeare, and the Blue Humanities. Most recently he is the author of Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization 1550 – 1719 (U Minn P, 2015) and co-editor of The Sea and Nineteenth-Century Anglophone Literary Culture (Routledge, 2016). He is a Series Editor for Environmental Humanities in Premodern Culture (EHPC) for Amsterdam University Press.

MemberAdi S. Bharat

I am a PhD candidate in French Studies at The University of Manchester. My thesis, funded by the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures and supervised by Joseph McGonagle and Barbara Lebrun, is on Representations of Jewish-Muslim Relations in Contemporary France. My thesis seeks to determine, firstly, to what extent a narrative of polarization (Mandel 2014) remains a dominant force in media and political representations of Jewish-Muslim relations and, secondly, explore how and to what extent French Jewish and Muslim writers and activists relate and respond to such a narrative consisting of dominant, reified binary definitions within the contemporary framework of difference-blind assimilationist republican universalism.