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MemberTon van Kalmthout

Ton van Kalmthout studied Dutch Language and Literature at the University of Nijmegen (now Radboud University Nijmegen) and gained his Ph.D. in 1998 at the University of Amsterdam with a thesis on multidisciplinary art clubs in the Netherlands between 1880 and 1914. He worked as a teacher of Dutch at secondary school, and taught at the teacher-training programmes for Dutch at Hogeschool Rotterdam and the University of Leiden. He also worked as a teacher and post-doctoral researcher at the Dutch Language and Culture Section of the University of Groningen. Since 2005, he is a senior researcher at Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands. His field of interest is the international distribution and reception of literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

MemberSteve Mentz

Steve Mentz is Professor of English at St. John’s University in New York City. His work explores Early Modern Literature, Ecocriticism, Shakespeare, and the Blue Humanities. Most recently he is the author of Break up the Anthropocene, (U Minn P, 2019), and  Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization 1550 – 1719 (U Minn P, 2015) and co-editor of The Sea and Nineteenth-Century Anglophone Literary Culture (Routledge, 2016). He is a Series Editor for Environmental Humanities in Premodern Culture (EHPC) for Amsterdam University Press.

MemberLaura Vilardell Domenech

I am currently (2018-) a Tenure-Track Assistant Professor at Northern Illinois University, where I teach Translation Studies and Spanish language and culture. In 2013 I completed my Ph.D. in translation and literary reception and I moved to Georgetown University to teach Language and Culture, as well as Translation (2015-2018). My main research area is the reception of translations, field for which I published a dozen articles so far. Nowadays, I focus my interests on the Spanish censorship over the translations into Catalan in the 1960s and more recently, I also study reception in social media of audiovisual content. My primary areas of study are translation and the history of publishing. More specifically, I specialize in literary reception, cross-border cultures and minority languages, with a focus on cultural studies and translation history. I make use of archives and field methods (e.g., interviews) in my research, and bring these methods and practices to the classroom when teaching Spanish culture and conversation courses as well as translation courses. My current work focuses on the censorship of translations into Catalan enforced by Spain’s dictator Francisco Franco during the 1960s. The goals are this project is twofold: first, to gain a better understanding of the means by which censorship prevented publications during this period. Second, to increase awareness of the forgotten publishers who suffered the pressure of the dictatorship and better understand how they continued to increase publications in banned fields. In this sense, I investigate how Catalan, that was prohibited in some of the public events and also at school, was kept alive thanks to translations into this language. I have been part of four research and development projects; two from the Catalan Government, (2009-2012 and 2014-2017) and two from the Ministry of Science and Innovation (2008-2011 and 2011-2014). I recently earned a grant (Institució de les Lletres Catalanes, Generalitat de Catalunya) to write a book about Josep M. Boix i Selva, director of Vergara Publishing House, focusing on the publishing house’s series of translations into Catalan (“Isard”) and its troubles with censorship.

MemberAdi S. Bharat

I am a scholar of modern and contemporary French culture, society, and politics. While most of my research is focused on the contemporary period, I have experience teaching courses (or “modules” in UK parlance) on French literature, history, culture, society, and politics in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, in addition to Islamic history. My work is interdisciplinary, intersecting with cultural studies, literary studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, and diaspora studies. My primary methodologies are qualitative: discourse analysis, literary analysis, and ethnography. In addition, I occasionally draw on corpus linguistics approaches to aid my discourse analysis research.

MemberAliya James Allen Weise

Aliya recently completed his doctoral dissertation at the the George Washington University with a focus on American Literature and Culture and Critical Animal Studies. He is currently an instructor at the San Diego State University with the College of Education’s School of Teacher Education as well as at San Diego High School with the Academy of Finance. Prior to his Ph.D., he complete a Master of Fine Arts in poetry at the University of Maryland and Bachelor of Arts in American Literature and Creative Writing at Western Washington University. Aliya is currently working on transforming his dissertation into a book-length study in addition to several creative writing projects.