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MemberKatherine Bowers

…U Of British Columbia (Canada)…

I am an Assistant Professor of Slavic Studies in the Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. I specialize in Russian literature and culture of the long nineteenth century, and teach classes about Russian, Slavic and comparative literature and culture. More information about my research and activities can be found on my institutional profile and my personal website.

MemberChristine Yao

Christine “Xine” Yao is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of British Columbia in the Department of English. She works on intersections of affect, race, gender, and sexuality in relation to science and law through long 19th century American literature. Her research has been published in J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists and American Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion. She is an award-winning instructor of literature, culture, and writing. She completed her Ph.D.  in English at Cornell University in 2016 with minors in American Studies and Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Dr. Yao’s postdoctoral, PhD, and MA work has been funded by competitive national grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Her archival research has been supported by travel grants to the American Antiquarian Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the College of the Library of Physicians of Philadelphia. Additional training thanks to the Center for American Visual Culture, the Futures of American Studies Institute at Dartmouth College, and the LGBT Leadership Academy at Cornell in Washington. For further information and CV, please see http://www.christineyao.com 

MemberAdrienne Williams Boyarin

Adrienne Williams Boyarin (PhD UC Berkeley, 2006) is Associate Professor of English and English Graduate Program Advisor at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. She is author of Miracles of the Virgin in Medieval England: Law and Jewishness in Marian Legends (D.S. Brewer 2010), praised as “elegantly written, scrupulously researched,” and a model of “codicological expertise” (Speculum 88.1, 2013). She is editor and translator of the alliterative Siege of Jerusalem (Broadview 2013, rev. in TLS) and Miracles of the Virgin in Middle English (Broadview 2015, rev. in TMR), and the founding Executive Editor of the journal Early Middle English (Arc Humanities/Amsterdam UP). Her research interests include Jewish-Christian polemics, medieval Anglo-Jewish history, Early Middle English (and the multilingual Early Middle English period broadly), manuscript studies, Marian texts, and gender studies. She is a former member of the MLA Executive Committee for TC Religion and Literature (2014-2019) and the MLA Delegate Assembly (2017-2019).  

MemberGraham Jensen

I am a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in English at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. My research interests include literary modernism, twentieth-century Canadian literature, poetry and poetics, and digital humanities research and methodologies. I am also principal investigator of the Canadian Modernist Magazines Project and a former graduate fellow with Editing Modernism in Canada. At the University of Victoria, I also hold an Associate Fellowship in the Centre for Studies in Religion and Society as well as a Digital Scholarship Fellowship in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab.

MemberAlyssa Arbuckle

I live and work in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Presently, I am the Associate Director of the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) at the University of Victoria. I focus on research facilitation — connecting researchers and partners, organizing academic conferences and events, writing reports and articles, etc. In this role with the ETCL I have the pleasure of working with the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) group and helping out with the coordination of the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). I am also an interdisciplinary PhD student at the University of Victoria, studying open social scholarship and its implementation (planned completion 2019). My studies have centred around digital humanities, new media, and contemporary American literature. I am especially interested in open access, digital publishing, and how text lives online. To this end, my work has appeared in Digital Studies, Digital Humanities Quarterly, and Scholarly and Research Communication, among other venues. I’ve given presentations, ran workshops, or coordinated events in Vancouver, Victoria, Whistler, Toronto, Ottawa, Austin, New York, Paris, and Sydney. Otherwise, I spend my time devoted to books, bicycling, yoga, friends, and exploring the Pacific Northwest.