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MemberMargaret Carson

My research focuses on translation in practice and theory, gender and translation, women surrealist artists/writers in the Americas, and transnational literature in small literary journals and presses. I am a longtime translator of contemporary Spanish-language literature. Translations include Letters, Dreams and Other Writings by Remedios Varo (Wakefield Press, 2018), Baroni: A Journey (Almost Island, 2017) and My Two Worlds (Open Letter, 2011) by Sergio Chejfec, Theory of Colors by Mercedes Roffé (belladonna*, 2005), and The Magic Lantern by José Tomás de Cuéllar (Oxford University Press, 2000). I was Translation Coordinator for Stages of Conflict: A Critical Anthology of Latin American Theater and Performance (University of Michigan Press, 2008). From 2014-2016 I co-chaired the PEN America Translation Committee.

Membernispero

I am a scholar of U.S. and Latin American literature and culture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In particular, my first book and my current projects reflect a transnational approach to the cultural history of capitalism. They address a common broad question: how are our local and national identities shaped by and through popular economic and political narratives? My book, A Cultural History of Underdevelopment: Latin America in the U.S. Imagination (University of Virginia Press, 2016) explores how Americans have mapped the hemisphere from the mid-19th century to the end of the Cold War in terms of an economic geography in which the United States was a rich nation among poor ones. The most common term for this geography and condition of poverty has been “underdevelopment,” a term from the social sciences that has also drawn on cultural generalizations about the origins and the spaces of poverty. Since I arrived at Wayne State, I have also taught and writen about the history and culture of Detroit, especially in the ways its image circulates outside the city–as the Motor City, Motown, the Arsenal of Democracy, and the city of ruins. My new project, Keywords for the Age of Austerity, is an evolving online work of historical etymology and cultural criticism. I trace the history of economic concepts in the mass media, uncovering the history and common use of popular terms like “accountability,” “entrepreneur,” and “innovation.”

MemberIfeoma C. Kiddoe Nwankwo

  Ifeoma Kiddoe Nwankwo, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Vanderbilt University. Her work centers on intercultural and intergenerational relations, particularly as they surface in the literary texts, oral narratives, and popular music of Afro-descendants in the U.S., Caribbean, and Latin America. Her publications include Black Cosmopolitanism; “Bilingualism, Blackness, and Belonging,”; “Race and Representation in the Digital Humanities;” Rhythms of the Afro-Atlantic World (co-edited with Mamadou Diouf); and African Routes, Caribbean Roots, Latino Lives. She is former Director of the Program in American Studies andhas just completed her first three-year term as Associate Provost for Strategic Initiatives and Partnerships.   Dr. Nwankwo’s innovative interdisciplinary projects use community-engaged research methodologies alongside literary critical ones to analyze and advance intercultural and intergenerational relations. These projects include Voices from Our AmericaTM, an international public scholarship and digital humanities project that uses interviews, autobiography and art production, along with archival research to uncover new aspects of communities’ histories then draws on those new sources to develop digital and print publications as well as workshops and other educational programs for K-12 teachers, older adults, and youth. Dr. Nwankwo’s projects also include The Wisdom of the Elders, an initiative focused on revealing and recognizing older adults’ life- and soul- sustaining wisdoms and productively incorporating them into K-12, undergraduate, graduate and health professional education.    

MemberMariela Mendez

I am an Associate Professor of Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Studies and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of Richmond. My research engages comparative literary studies and feminist and queer theories to interrogate representations of genders and sexualities in print culture throughout Latin America. In particular, I address the various ways in which women writers have used the press to craft alternative spaces of cultural, aesthetic, and political intervention that disrupt heteronormative ideologies. I teach at the intersection of Latin American Studies, Transnational Feminisms, Queer Theory, and Feminist New Materialisms, and I am also interested in the political potential of a transnational feminist critical practice.

MemberJuliane Braun

I specialize in multilingual and transnational literatures of the early Americas.  My  first book, Creole Drama: Theatre and Society in Antebellum New Orleans, was published by the University of Virginia Press in 2019. It examines the transnational, political, and social reach of French Louisianian theatrical culture. Click here to buy a copy: https://www.upress.virginia.edu/title/5146 Recently, I have started a new project, tentatively titled Translating the Pacific: Imperial Imaginations, Nature Writing, and Early Modern Print Cultures in which I explore how imperial incursions into the Pacific during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries shaped conceptions of nature and the environment in the Atlantic world. I am also the co-editor of America After Nature: Democracy, Culture, Environment (Winter, 2016) and my work has appeared or is forthcoming in the journals Early American Literature, Atlantic Studies: Global Currents, and Cambridge University’s African American Literature in Transition Series.

MemberAndrew N. Rubin

Andrew N. Rubin is a Scholar in Residence in English and Comparative Literature and Critical and Postcolonial Theory at Georgetown University. His most recent book, Archives of Authority: Empire, Culture, and the Cold War, was published by Princeton University Press in 2012 in its TransNation/Translation series. He is also the co-editor of Adorno: A Critical Reader and the co-editor of The Edward Said Reader, as well as a forthcoming edition of Said’s collected works. He has written extensively on Edward W. Said, Theodor Adorno, George Orwell, and Joseph Conrad, and more widely on subjects such as the category of world literature and transnational modernisms for journals including Alif: Journal of Comparative Poetics, The South Atlantic Quarterly, The Journal of Palestine Studies, Arab Studies Quarterly, The Nation, The New Statesman, and al-ahram. In 2006, he was nominated by the B(R)ussel’s Tribunal Human Rights award for his essay in The New Statesman on the assassination of Iraqi academics and intellectuals. In 2007, he was the recipient of a Lannan Residency. He is currently working on a manuscript entitled Imperial Traces: Late Imperialism and the Terrain of World Literature, and has recently completed a monograph entitled Exiled in America: José Marti, Hannah Arendt, C. L. R. James, and Edward Said. More information can be found on http://andrewrubin.me.He has taught, researched, and written in the fields of Transnational Modernism, Twentieth Century Anglophone Literature and Culture, World Literature, Critical and Postcolonial Theory, and Comparative Literature.