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MemberRoger Whitson

…Selected Publications

Steampunk and Nineteenth-Century Digital Humanities: Literary Retrofutures, Alternate Histories, Media Archaeologies. London: Routledge, 2016.

William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and Social Media. Co-authored with Jason Whittaker. London: Routledge. Hardback, 2012. Paperback, 2015.
Reviews: Lau…

I specialize in media theory, digital humanities, and nineteenth-century British literature. My research investigates how the Nineteenth Century is adapted, remediated, and transmitted into more contemporary art and digital media. I’ve specifically looked at this phenomenon by exploring the adaptation of William Blake and by investigating the alternate history reconstruction of the Victorian Period in steampunk. I also occasionally write about digital pedagogy.

MemberJonathan Potter

…27/jonathan-potter-looking-at-victorians-looking-at-photographs-decoding-nineteenth-century-stereoscopic-experience 
·         ‘“A Box From Another Time”: Reading Steampunk Objects’, Journal of Victorian Culture Online, 7 April 2015: http://jvc.oup.com/2015/04/07/jonathan-potter-a-box-from-another-time-reading-steampunk-objects 
·  …

https://mla.hcommons.org/members/jpotter/

MemberBrian Croxall

I’m Assistant Research Professor of Digital Humanities in Brigham Young University’s Office of Digital Humanities. I imagine, design, and manage digital scholarship projects in collaboration with faculty, colleagues, and students. I also teach classes in our Digital Humanities and Technology minor. I’m passionate about integrating digital approaches into pedagogy. Prior to coming to BYU, I worked at the Centers for Digital Scholarship at both Brown University and Emory University. I was Digital Humanities Librarian at Brown and Digital Humanities Strategist and Lecturer of English at Emory. At both schools, I managed large, multi-year, grant-funded projects in collaboration with faculty, librarians, graduate students, and other staff. These projects included the digitization of previously classified documents about Brazil / US relations; a digital edition of and edited collection about a 17th-century book of alchemy; the paved-over landscape and history of the Battle of Atlanta; the literary networks of writers in Northern Ireland; and the relationship among poets and editors in mid-century modern American poetry. I completed my Ph.D. at Emory University, investigating the relationships among technology, media, and psychological trauma. After that, I taught modern and contemporary American literature as well as courses on media studies, digital culture, and war fiction for a year at Emory and another year at Clemson University. I then became Emory’s first CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow and Emerging Technologies Librarian. Somewhere in there, I co-edited both a book and a journal issue on steampunk, edited a cluster at #Alt-Academy, and wrote for the group blog ProfHacker. I am an elected member of the Executive Council of the Modern Language Association and the elected Secretary of the international Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations. I am a past member of the Executive Council of the Association for Computers and the Humanities. I use Twitter on occasion and track my publications with ORCID.

MemberRebecca Powers

…tures. 2018 Full Text

Translation of Catherine Nesci, “Introduction” to Mystères de Paris et Mystères urbains américains. Du récit des bas-fonds au film noir et au « Steampunk » (1840-2015). Medias19.org.  Full Text

“Review: Jenny l’ouvrière: drame en cinq actes by Adrien Decourcelle and Jules Barbier. Edited by Janice Best and Nico…

https://mla.hcommons.org/members/rebeccapowers/