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MemberMatthew K. Gold

…Debates in the Digital Humanities. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

This collection of essays presents perspectives on the debates that have surrounded the recent emergence of the digital humanities as an academic discipline. Among the issues addressed by over thirty prominent digital humanities scholars are the struggles to define the field; the relationship of DH to theory; the prospects for new forms of scholarship and new models of scholarly communication; the past, present, and future directions of DH; the status of pedagogy within the field; the range of possible cultural approaches to DH; the methodologies that define DH inquiry; and the institutional ramifications of DH.
An interactive, open-access, social edition of the text, created by the GC Digital Scholarship Lab in partnership with the University of Minnesota Press, was released in January 2013: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.e…

Digital humanities, digital pedagogy, networked rhetoric, scholarly communication, 19th century American literature

MemberNicky Agate

…Assistant Director of Scholarly Communication and Digital Projects…

I am interested in how various iterations of “openness”—including OA publishing models, open educational models, and open peer review, as well as open and transparent scholarly practices—might help foster a more inclusive, equitable, and community-oriented academy. I am co-PI on the Mellon-funded HumetricsHSS initiative, an investigation into the viability of a values-based framework for indicating excellence, and a founding editor of The Idealis, an overlay journal promoting the best in open-access scholarly communication. I serve on the editorial board of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication and the organizing committee of the Force11 Scholarly Communication Institute.

MemberAngela Gibson

…Director of Scholarly Communication…

I am interested in words and the people that shape them. My work involves scholarly communication, editorial practice, and writing pedagogy. My background is in medieval literature and history, with a focus on fictional representations of the multifaceted crime of abduction in Middle English literature and concepts of personal and political consent formation in premodern England.

MemberKathleen Fitzpatrick

Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Digital Humanities and Professor of English at Michigan State University. Prior to assuming this role in 2017, she served as Associate Executive Director and Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association. She is author of Generous Thinking: The University and the Public Good (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019), as well as Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011) and The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is project director of Humanities Commons, an open-access, open-source network serving more than 17,000 scholars and practitioners in the humanities.

MemberAlexander Gil

Alex Gil is Digital Scholarship Librarian at Columbia University Libraries. He collaborates with faculty, students and library professionals leveraging computational and network technologies in humanities research, pedagogy and scholarly communications. He curates the Studio@Butler at Columbia University, a tech-light library innovation space focused on digital scholarship and pedagogy; he is founder and faculty moderator of Columbia’s Group for Experimental Methods in the Humanities, a vibrant trans-disciplinary research cluster focused on experimental humanities; senior editor of sx archipelagos, a journal of Caribbean Digital Studies, and co-wrangler of The Caribbean Digital conference series. Current projects include Ed, a digital platform for minimal editions of literary texts; Aimé Césaire and The Broken Record, a minimal computing experiment in long-form digital scholarship; and, In The Same Boats, a visualization of trans-Atlantic intersections of black intellectuals in the 20th century.